Ewer Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Ewer Family Coat of Arms

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Ewer Coat of Arms Meaning

Ewer Name Origin & History

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Ewer Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Ewer blazon are the tiger, cross pattee and bar. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, or and sable .

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.1The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P191 The tiger is an interesting example here being named after a real animal but depicted in rather and mythical appearance. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Tiger Later arms came to use a more lifelike appearance and the usage of heraldic tiger and natual tiger arose to make the distinction. Wade tells us that the mythical bearing of such a creature signifies “great fierceness and valour when enraged” and suggests that we should be wary as the holder may be “one whosee resentment will be dangerous if aroused”! 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P63

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 13Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross, typically involving patterning along the edges 14Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67, or fanciful, decorative endings to the arms of the cross 15A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128. The cross pattee is typical of these, pattee meaning “spreading”, and so the ends of the arms of the cross curve gently outwards to rather pleasing effect. 16A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Pattée

The bar is a thin, horizontal stripe across the centre of the shield 17A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bar, usually in groups of two or three (any more and there would be confusion with barry, a treatment of horizontal lines of alternating colours). Bars can be a distinctive and easily recognised device, early examples include those awarded by Henry III of England to the family MAUDYT Argent, two bars gules.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Ewer Name

Ewer Origin:

England, France, Germany

Origins of Ewer:

This most interesting and unique surname has two possible origins. The first origin may be a nickname of “Ewer,” which itself is of early English origin, from the Middle English “ewer,” from the Old French “aiguier,” Latin “aqua,” which means water. It is a professional name for a servant who provided guests at a table with water to wash their hands. However, the name also appeared in Germany, where it is a Low German patronymic surname, acquiring from a particular Germanic name which was a combination of the components “eber”, which means wild pig, and “hard,” which means firm, hardy, strong. It has also given us the English surname “Everard,” which was originally found largely in East Anglia, having presented in the Germanic form by the Normans. Early examples of the surname contain as Richard Lewer, in the Feet of Fines of Surrey in 1219, Alexander Euer, in the Bedfordshire Premium Rolls of 1309 and Rober Lower, in the Record of the Freemen of the City of York in 1513. Robert Ewers was an early settler and landholder in Virginia in 1626.

Variations:

More common variations are: Yewer, Eweir, Ewery, Ewere, Euwer, Ewyer, Eweri, Ewero, Eiwer, Uewer.

England:

The surname Ewer was first found in Ayrshire, previously a division in the southwestern Strathclyde area of Scotland, that today makes up the Cabinet Areas of South, East, and North Ayrshire. One of the first recordings of the name was Adam Urri who shows as burgess of Irvine in 1260 and Huwe Urry of Ayrshire who distributed allegiance to King Edward I of England in his brief intervention into Scotland in 1296. Reginald Urry held land in Irvine in 1323 and William Urri retired the lands of Fulton in 1409. Another section of the family appeared in the Fetteresso church, Kincardineshire and for the most part, these names contained “de” expressing “of.” Hugh de Urre declared fealty at St. John of Perth and after that with a different spelling as Hugh Uny at Forfar, 1296. This next entry is probably another person giving homage to King Edward I.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Richard le Ewer, dated about 1185, in the “Records of the Tempars in England in the 12th Century”. It was during the time of King Henry II who was known to be the “The Builder of Churches,” dated 1154 – 1189. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Ewer had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Some of the individuals with the name Ewer who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Elizabeth Ewer at the age of 4, arrived in New England in 1635. Sara Ewer at the age of 28, landed in America in 1635. Tho Ewer at the age of 1, landed in New England in 1635. Thomas Ewer, who landed in Massachusetts in 1636. Henry Ewer, who arrived in New England in 1637.

Canada:

Some of the individuals with the surname Ewer who came to Canada in the 18th century included Robert Ewer, who landed in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1749-1752. Robert Ewer, who arrived in Nova, Scotia in 1749.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Ewer: United States 1,300; England 500; Australia 217; Canada 99; South Africa 73; Wales 45; Scotland 33; New Zealand 28; United Arab Emirates 23; Indonesia 14.

Notable People:

Hanns Heinz Ewers (November 1871 in Düsseldorf–June 1943 in Berlin) was a German artist, poet, scholar, and writer of short novels and stories. While he wrote on a wide range of subjects, he is now known chiefly for his works of horror, especially his trilogy of novels about the experiences of Frank Braun, a character modeled on himself. The best known of these is Alraune (1911).

Ewer Family Gift Ideas

Browse Ewer family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Luton, co. Bedford, and Lees-Langley, co Herts). (Bishop of Bangor, 1771). Or, a tiger statant sa. on a chief gu. three crosses pattee ar. Crest—A pheon or, headed ar. mounted on a broken dart gu. environed with a snake ppr.
2) Ar. two bars gu.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P191
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Tiger
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P63
13. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
14. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67
15. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128
16. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Pattée
17. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bar