Ewers Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Ewers Family Coat of Arms

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Ewers Coat of Arms Meaning

Ewers Name Origin & History

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Ewers Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Ewers blazon are the flaunch, talbot and heraldic tiger. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, or and ermine .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

There are a number of major, simple and easily recognisable shapes and big patterns that are known as ordinaries. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Ordinaries The flaunch (or more properly flaunches as they are always in pairs) is a interesting example of the type, being a shape curving inwards from edge vertical edge, each reaching about one third of the distance across. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Flaunch Wade’s researchs into the symbology of heraldry leads him to conclude that they represent a “reward given for virtue and learning”. 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P52

Many breeds of dog appear in coats of arms, reflecting their status as man’s closet companion. The talbot is a hunting dog akin to a terrier, and usually illustrated in a lifelike style and eager pose. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog In common with the other heraldic dogs, Wade suggests that their presence should suggest “courage, vigilance and loyal fidelity”. 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P68 Others might say we need look no further than a pleasure in the hunt and the affection for this sturdy breed.

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? 15A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P191 The tiger is an interesting example here being named after a real animal but depicted in rather and mythical appearance. 16A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Tiger Later arms came to use a more lifelike appearance and the usage of heraldic tiger and natual tiger arose to make the distinction. Wade tells us that the mythical bearing of such a creature signifies “great fierceness and valour when enraged” and suggests that we should be wary as the holder may be “one whosee resentment will be dangerous if aroused”! 17The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P63

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Ewers Name

Ewers Origin:

England, Germany

Origins of Ewers:

This most interesting and uncommon surname has two possible origins. The first origin may be a nickname of “Ewer,” which itself is an old English source, from the Middle English “ewer,” from the Old French “aiguier,” Latin “aqua,” which means water. It is a professional name for a worker who served guests at a table with water to wash their hands. However, the name also appeared in Germany, where it is a Low German nickname, acquiring from a particular Germanic name which was a combination of the components “eber,” which means a wild swine, and “hard,” which means strong, brave, firm. It has also given us the English name “Everard,” which first found especially in East Anglia, having mentioned in the Germanic form by the Normans. Early examples of the surname contain as the Richard Lewer, in the Feet of Fines of Surrey in 1219, Alexander Euer, in the Bedfordshire Premium Rolls of 1309 and Rober Lower, in the Record of the Freemen of the City of York in 1513.

Variations:

More common variations are: Yewers, Ewerse, Euwers, Ewears, Ewerys, Eowers, Eweres, Ewerws, Eers, Ewrs.

England:

The surname Ewers first appeared in Ayrshire, previously a district in the southwestern Strathclyde area of Scotland, that today builds the Conference Areas of South, East, and North Ayrshire. One of the first registers of the name was Adam Urri who shows as a citizen of Irvine in 1260 and Huwe Urry of Ayrshire who performed the duty to King Edward I of England in his brief interruption into Scotland in 1296. Reginald Urry held land in Irvine in 1323 and William Urri retired the estates of Fulton in 1409. Another section of the family appeared in the Fetteresso Church, Kincardineshire and for the most areas, these names contained “de” mentioning “of.” Hugh de Urre asserted faithfulness at St. John of Perth and after that with a various spelling as Hugh Uny at Forfar, 1296.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Richard le Ewer, dated about 1185, in the “Records of the Templars in England in the 12th century”. It was during the time of King Henry II, who was known to be the “The Builder of Churches,” dated 1216 – 1272. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Ewers had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Ewers settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 18th, and 19th. Some of the individuals with the name Ewers who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Johannes Ewers landed in Pennsylvania in 1752

Some of the population with the surname Ewers arrived in the United States in the 19th century included M Franziska Ewers came to America in 1836. Bern Ewers landed in America in 1847. Carolina Ewers, who arrived in New York, NY in 1850.

Australia:

People with the surname Ewers who settled in Australia in the 19th century included William Ewers arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Princess Royal” in 1848.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Ewers: United States 3,242; Germany 2,791; England 726; South Africa 438; Australia 373; Sweden 232; Jamaica 196; New Zealand151; Brazil 143; Wales 124.

Notable People:

Dave Ewers (1990–), is a Rugby Union player born in Harare, Zimbabwe

Ezra P. Ewers (born circa 1840), was an American Civil War fighter.

Gustav von Ewers (1779–1830), was a German legal professor.

Hanns Heinz Ewers (1871–1943), was a German author, philosopher, and artist.

John C. Ewers (1909–1997), was an American ethnologist and museum administrator.

John K. Ewers (1904–1978), was an Australian novel writer and poet.

Marisa Ewers (1989–), is a German soccer player.

Ewers Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Sa. two talbots’ heads erased in pale or, betw. two flaunches erm. Crest—A staff raguly or.
2) (Reg. Ulster’s Office). Or, an heraldic tiger pass, sa. Crest—A demi heraldic tiger ramp. or.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Ordinaries
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Flaunch
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P52
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P68
15. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P191
16. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Tiger
17. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P63