Favell Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Favell Family Coat of Arms

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Favell Coat of Arms Meaning

Favell Name Origin & History

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Favell Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Favell blazon are the escallop, chevron and bezant. The three main tinctures (colors) are argent, sable and or .

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The escallopoccurs often in arms, represented as the outside of the shell, sometimes “fluted” of a different colour 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop. It has been part of heraldic tradition almost from the beginning of the art, Henry III of England awarded Gules, 3 escallopes argent to Herbert de CHAMBERLEYNE in the 13th century, and it is present in the heraldry of almost all countries 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299. It is believed that they were adopted as badges of those going to the Holy Land and can be found in the arms of many a crusading family. Hence Wade’s suggested association of the scallop with those that “complete long journeys to far countries” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91.

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 12A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.13The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 15A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the bezant Is a typical example of this, and in British Heraldry always takes the tincture or. It shares the same root as the name Byzantium, being associated with the gold coin of that city and indeed, in some heraldic traditions is represented as a coin-like disk in perspective. Wade suggests that the use of this device refers to ” one who had been found worthy of trust and treasure.” 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P122

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Favell Name

Favell Origin:

England, France

Origins of Name:

The surname of Favell is of medieval English origin with French roots. It was originally a nickname, and many European surnames would also follow this trend. Nicknames were used in European history as a reference to personal characteristics, which ranged from physical attributes to odd peculiarities; mental characteristics (strength or weaknesses) to moral characteristics; and even as far as resembling animals such as a bird’s appearance or a horse’s disposition. The English version of the surname was Favill or Favel and came from the root French word ‘fauve’ or ‘fauvel’ which means nicknames. In old French the word was ‘fauve’, meaning tawny, or someone who had a dusky complextion. Another variation was the Old French word ‘favel’ which meant story or tale. The name grew from the definition of a sly or cunning horse in a number of animal tales in popular medieval literature. Later it was used to describe someone who was devious or quick-witted.

Variations:

More common variations are: Faviell, Faivell, Favella, Favelle, Fauvell, Favelli, Favello, Feavell, Favwell, Favel

History:

England:

Early known examples of the surname of Favell was in 1195 in Herefordshire for Rannulf Fauuel, a unique variation. Later William Fauel in 1346 in Wiltshire was known to bear this surname. In 1617 at St. Dunstan, Stepney, London John Favill, son of William was christened.

The coat of arms for this name is the well-known black shield with a gold chevron between three silver escallops. A sword in pale is the Crest.

The first known recorded spellilng of the name is for Eudo Faluel in 1160. His name was recorded in the Book of Seals for Yorkshire. This was necessary at the time so England could properly tax its citizens. This was known as the Poll tax.

After time many wider variations of the surname would develop from the original Favell.

United States

Some of the very first known North American immigrants bore the Favell surname. Throughout the 17th century many more would migrate to North America settling in Newfoundland, Maine, Virginia and the Carolinas.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Favell:

England 543, Canada 256, Australia 141, United States 140, Tanzania 49, New Zealand 7, Portugal 2

Notable People:

Anthony Favell MBE (born 1939), A Conservative Member of Parliament for Stockport for a long period of time from 1983 to 1992. In 2007 he was elected to High Peak Borough Council.

Doug Favell (born 1945), retired Canadian professional ice hockey goaltender that played many years in the National Hockey League. He also played lacrosse professionally, and was the only player to be drafted in the 1967 expansion draft and the 1979 expansion draft.

Henry Favell (1845–1896), Anglican priest during the 19th century. He was baptized in 1845 and spent six years as a curate in Birmingham. He eventually became the archdeacon of Sheffield in 1895.

Les Favell (1929–1987), Australian cricketer who played for 7 years. He was a widely popular character and batsman who batted the ball around the ground.

Favell Family Gift Ideas

Browse Favell family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Sa. a chev. or, betw. three escallops ar. Crest—A sword in pale, supporting a maunch ppr.
2) (co. Northumberland). Ar. (another, or) a bend and bordure gu. bezantee.
3) (Kirby Hall, Catterick, co. York. Dugdales Visitation, 1666). Motto—En Dieu ma foi. Sa. a chev. betw. three escallops ar. (another, or).

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References   [ + ]

1. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91
12. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
13. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
15. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P122