Fifield Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Fifield Family Coat of Arms

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Fifield Coat of Arms Meaning

Fifield Name Origin & History

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Fifield Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Fifield blazon are the acorn, cinquefoil and falcon. The three main tinctures (colors) are vert, or and ermine .

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

Amongst the natural objects depicted on a coat of arms, trees feature frequently, either in whole or as individual branches and leaves or fruit. 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P94, 262, 407. The acorn, often represented in its early state as vert (green) 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Acorn can be associated of course with the mighty oak, signifying, according to Wade, “antiquity and strength”, for obvious reasons.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The cinquefoil is also of this type, being drawn, at least a little, realistically and often to very pleasing effect. It is shown as five-petalled flower, each petal quite rounded but with a distinct tip. It is sometimes pierced with a hole in the centre and usually appears on its own, without any leaves. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cinquefoil It has no fixed colour but can appear in any of the available heraldic tinctures.

Birds of great variety occur throughout heraldry, at least in name 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233. The falcon is a bird long associated with hunting and we need look no further than a liking for this pursuit for its presence on many early coats of arms. 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Falcon We also find many of the accessories used in falconry depicted on arms, and a surprising number of terms from the art of falconry have found use in modern English idioms and the interested reader is recommended to search out the origins of the phrases hoodwinked and “cadging” a lift.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Fifield Name

Fifield Origin:

England

Origins of Fifield:

It is a geographical name listed in the London region from the middle of the 16th Century. It acquires from the hamlet of Fyfield in Berkshire, an area which was listed in the Anglo-Saxon records of 956, A.D. in the rule of King Edwy (955-959) as “aet fif hidum” and in the Domesday Book of 1086 as “Five hides.” This latter spelling shows the real source and meaning “A place of five hides,” this being the common land of a then, similar in status to the next Norman fighter. A “hide” was itself enough for the support of one “free” family, and different from fifteen to thirty acres. The “present” Hamlet spelling is about 1500. The surname recordings are Robert Fifield, a witness at St. Giles Cripplegate in March 1638, in the rule of Charles 1, “The Martyr,” 1625-1649.

Variations:

More common variations are: Fiefield, Fiffield, Faifield, Feifield, Fifieled, Fifeld, Fyfield, Fafield, Fifeild, Fifiled.

England:

The surname Fifield first appeared in Wiltshire where they held a family seat as Kings of the Castle. The Saxon impact of English history declined after the war of Hastings in 1066. French was the language of courts for the next three centuries, and the Norman rule overcame. But Saxon surnames remained and the family name was first introduced in the year 1236 when William de Fyfield held lands in that shire.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Ann Fifeld, dated about 1575, named at “St. Mary Whitechapel”, London. It was during the time of Queen Elizabeth I, who was known to be the “Good Queen Bess,” dated 1558-1603. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varietions of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Fifield had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Fifield settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the individuals with the name Fifield who landed in the United States in the 17th century included William Fifield, who arrived in Newbury, Massachusetts in 1639. John Fifield, who came to Massachusetts in 1665.

People with the surname Fifield who settled in the United States in the 18th century included A B Fifield, who landed in San Francisco, California in 1851.

The following century saw many more Fifield surnames arrive. Some of the population with the surname Fifield who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Emily Fifield at the age of 65, who landed in America, in 1906. Geo. A. Fifield, who landed in America, in 1907. Carrie E. Fifield, who landed in America, in 1907. Jane Fifield at the age of 22 landed in America, in 1908. Ethel Fifield at the age of 37 shifted to America, in 1910.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Fifield: United States 3,320; England 1,000; Canada 821; New Zealand 293; South Africa 256; Australia 243; Wales 102; Scotland 92; Italy 56; Singapore 18.

Notable People:

Adele Fifield (born 1966), was a Canadian manager of the War Amps’ National Amputee Centre.

Arthur Fifield was a founder of English publishing house A. C. Fifield, taken over in 1922 by Jonathan Cape.

Cec Fifield was an Australian rugby league football player and referee of the 20th century.

Darren Fifield was an English fighter of the 1990s.

Edwin G. Fifield (June 1862 – December 1925) was an American businessman and leader. He was born in Janesville, Wisconsin.

Jim Fifield was an American administrator of EMI.

Mitchell Peter “Mitch” Fifield was born in January 1967. He is an Australian leader. He is a representative of the Australian Senate mentioning the state of Victoria for the Liberal Party since March 2004

Samuel S. Fifield (June 1839–February 1915) was a Wisconsin leader and prominent merchant. The town of Fifield, Wisconsin was called after him.

Elaine Fifield (1930–1999), was an Australian ballerina.

Fifield Family Gift Ideas

Browse Fifield family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Notes: None. Blazon: Per fesse vert and ar. a pale counterchanged, three acorns or.
2) Notes: (Bromley, co. Kent). Blazon: Erm. on a bend engr. az. three cinquefoils or. Crest—A falcon rising gu.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P94, 262, 407
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Acorn
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cinquefoil
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Falcon