Fish Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Fish Family Coat of Arms

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Fish Coat of Arms Meaning

Fish Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Fishe.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Fish. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Fish Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Fish blazon are the mullet, dolphin, fleur-de-lis and crescent. The three main tinctures (colors) are or, argent and sable .

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 10A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

In the days before television and the internet it was a rare heraldic artist that had ever seen a dolphin for real, so we should not be surprised that the heraldic representation is not instantly recognisable. Despite this, we should not forget that these artists considered the dolphin to be the king of fish, playing the same role as the lion in the animal kingdom. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dolphin For reasons not immediately clear, Wade suggests that the dolphin was regarded as an “affectionate fish, fond of music”. 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P83

The fleur-de-lys (“flower of the lily”) has a long and noble history and was a symbol associated with the royalty of France even before heraldry became widespread. 14Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3. The Lily flower is said to represent “Purity, or whiteness of soul”15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134 and sometimes associated with the Virgin Mary. The fleur-de-lys is also used as a small “badge”, known as a mark of cadency to show that the holder is the sixth son of the present holder of the arms 16A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Fish Name

Fish Origin:

English, German, Jewish

Origins of Name:

The Fish surname can be traced back to medieval lords over 1000 years ago to Yorkshire, where the family held political and economic influences in the area. The surname derives from the Olde English 7th century word fisc meaning fish. In 1086, a land survey to raise taxes commissioned by William the Conqueror to evaluate and estimate the land and resources owned by England recorded the first personal name of “Fisc”. The surname Fish was first recorded near the beginning of the 13th century. The name was used to describe someone who caught or sold fish. Initially, the job someone was associated with would be used as their surname and eventually passed down to descendants whether or not they were a part of that profession.

Variations:

More common variations are:

Fishe, Fysh, Fyshe, Fisch, FIsha, Faish, Fishi, Feish, Fisho, Fishu, Fhish, Fisc

History:

England:

The first appearance of the surname after the 11th century Surnames would become necessary as the English government introduced personal taxation, known as Poll Tax. The first recorded spelling of the surname Fish would be in 1202 documented by the English treasury of one Ernis Fish.

Is in Suffolk. Daniel Fisc in 1208 appeared in the Calendar Rolls of Suffolk and Robert Fisk in 1230 appeared in the Pipe Rolls of Northumberland. Later, in the 14th century a common derivative of the name would appear. A French influence of the name would begin to use the article ‘le’ preceding the last name. For example, Robert le Fissh.

In 1635, one Christopher Fish would board a pilgrim ship, “Ann and Elizabeth”, from London that would sail to Barbados.

The surname Fish is the 1574th most common name in Great Britain. The highest concentrations are found in West Yorkshire and Cumbria.

Germany:

The German Jewish spelling of the name is Fisch. It derives from the Middle High German word visch meaning fish. Originally discovered in Saxony, at the time Germany was occupied by many different Barbarian tribes fighting for land and power. Eventually, the name would branch out into many different houses, each with varying roles in social and political agendas.

In the same way as the Anglo-Saxon version of the name, it describes someone whose occupation is that of a fish merchant or fisherman. It was also used in Germany to describe someone who resembles a fish. The German Jews adopted the name as an ornamental name.

Fish Today:

28,000 in the United States

10,000 in Ethiopia

8,000 in Myanmar

7,000 in England

4,000 in South Africa

Notable People:

Albert Fish (1870), American serial killer and cannibal

Albert Fish (1922), Canadian politician

Bobby Fish (1976), American professional wrestler

Farnum Fish (1896), early American aviator

Henry Fish (1838) New Zealand politician

Matt Fish (1969) American basketball player

Michael Fish (1940), UK fashion designer

Morris Fish (1938), Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada

Preserved Fish (1766–1846) New York shipping merchant

Simon Fish (died 1531), 16th-century Protestant reformer

Stuyvesant Fish (1851), president of Illinois Central Railroad

Fish Family Gift Ideas

Browse Fish family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (The Height, co. York, Watson's Hist, of Halifax). Or, a fess betw. three mullets sa.
2) (Kempton Park, co. Middlesex). Az. a fesse wavy or, betw. two crescents in chief and a dolphin embowed in base ar. Crest—On a rock ppr. a stork erm. beaked and legged gu. charged on the breast with an increscent of the last.
3) (Coventry. Her. Visit.). Sa. a chev. wavy betw. three fleurs-de-lis ar. Crest—A tiger’s head erased erm. maned and tusked or.
4) (Lissameon, co. Cavan, bart., extinct. Fun. Ent. 1623, Sir John Fish, created a bart. 1621). Or, on a bend sa. five mullets ar. over all a fess of the last.
5) (co. Bedford). Az. a fess ar. over all on a bend sa. five mullets or.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
10. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dolphin
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P83
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
16. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489