Gard Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Gard Family Coat of Arms

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Gard Coat of Arms Meaning

Gard Name Origin & History

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Gard Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Gard blazon are the griffin, bird and tower. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, or and vert .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? As heraldry developed a whole menagerie of imagined creatures 9Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164 came into being, and their various representations became more or less standardised in form and appearance. The griffin is perhaps the most common of these creatures, being a chimera with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin. It is most often in the pose known as rampant segreant, on its hind legs with claws and wings extended. Vinycomb has much to say on the subject of the griffin, perhaps summarised in his belief that it represents “strength and vigilance”.]11Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150

Birds of great variety occur throughout heraldry, at least in name 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233. In truth, despite the proliferation of species, the actual depictions can sometimes be hard to distinguish! The crane, heron and stork are commonly to be found on a coat of arms but all tend to share the same stylised appearance 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P164.

Architectural items, from individual components to entire buildings 14Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 92 feature frequently as charges In a coat of arms. Not surprisingly, considering the times from which many arms date, fortifications are common. The tower Is a typical example of an object from the world of architecture adopted, albeit in a stylised form, for use in heraldry. It can be placed alone, or frequently with three turrets on the top, known as a tower triple towered, and can have doors and windows of a different colour. 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Tower In continental European heraldry they are often accompanied by pictorial effects such as armoured knights scaling them on ladders.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Gard Name

Gard Origin:

England

Origin of Gard:

This unique name is a professional surname for a watcher or warden. It was acquired from the pre 9th century ancient French word “Garde”, which means “to defend or to watch,” it entered into England after the Norman Invasion of 1066. It is used in combination with the Ancient English pre 7th century word “ward” with an identical meaning. Both words were acquired from a Germanic word “weard”. In the present day, this surname holds three main spellings pattern, Guard, Gard, and Geard. Previous examples of the surname recordings consist of John le Gard in the 1275 rolls of the city of Worcester, and at the same time William la Garde is listed in the 1309 revolution of Bedord. The following name recordings taken from the London local records consists of such examples as Agnis Gart in 1608, Edmund Geyard in 1622, Anne Gard in 1642, and Hannah Guerd in 1787. Examples collected from the parish lists consist of John Guard who married Mary Morgan at St Dunstans in the East, Stepney, in May 1642, at the same time the naming lists George Geard, son of John and Rebecca Geard, at St. Mary Woolnoth, London, in April 1684.

Variations:

More common variations are: Guard, Goard, Garde, Gaurd, Gared, Garod, Garad, Gardy, Garud, Gardi.

Ireland:

The surname Gard was found in the Division of Cork (Irish: Corcaigh) the old Kingdom of Deis Muin (Desmond), situated on the southwest banks of Ireland in the division of Munster, where they held a family seat from old times, before the Anglo-Norman Invasion of Ireland by Strongbow in 1172 A.D.

England:

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Alan de Richard le Gard, dated 1275, in the “Subsidy Rolls of Worcestershire”. It was during the time of King Edward I who was known to be the “Hammer of the Scots,” 1272 – 1307. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Gard settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Gard who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Margaret Gard at the age of 24, who landed in Virginia in 1635.

Some of the people with the surname Gard who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Robert Gard, who landed in Virginia in 1700.

Some of the people with the surname Gard who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Juan Gard at the age of 57 and Mauel G Gard at the age of 8 both arrived in New Orleans, La in 1829. Peter Gard, who arrived in Indiana in 1840. Q J Gard, who landed in San Francisco, California in 1850 and Miss Gard arrived in America in 1856.

Australia:

Some of the people with the surname Gard who settled in Australia in the 19th century included Thomas Bennett Gard who was an English prisoner from Wiltshire aboard the “Arab” in July 1822, arriving in Van Diemen’s Land, Australia. William Gard and Elizabeth Gard both arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Cleveland” in the same year in 1839. Thomas Gard arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Cressy” in 1847. Richard Gard, at the age of 18 arrived in South Australia in 1856 aboard the ship “Lord Raglan.”

New Zealand:

Some of the people with the surname Gard who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included Frederic Gard at the age of 24, was a farm laborer, arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Ocean Mail” in 1875. William George Gard, at the age of 25 and Sarah A. Gard, at the age of 21, both arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Rodney” in the same year in 1875.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Gard: United States 5,594; England 817; France 1,323; Sweden 718; Germany 471; India 326; Tanzania 304; Australia 804; Canada 442; South Africa 329.

Notable People:

Warren Gard (1873 – 1929), was an American lawyer and lawmaker.

Toby Gard (born 1972), English computer game character designer and consultant.

John Gard (born 1963), American politician.

Alex Gard (1900 – 1948), Russian cartoonist.

Robert Gard, American military strategist.

Mike Gard (born 1952), Australian politician.

Gard Family Gift Ideas

Browse Gard family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: (co. Kent). Blazon: Azure on a chevron argent three birds vert membered gules on a chief or, three griffins segreant sable. Crest—A tower argent between two laurel branches vert.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
9. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin
11. Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P164
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 92
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Tower