Gibb Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Gibb Family Coat of Arms

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Gibb Coat of Arms Meaning

Gibb Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Gibb. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Gibb Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Gibb blazon are the arrow, mullet and stag. The two main tinctures (colors) are gules and or.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89. The regular prescence of the arrow, both singly and in groups is evidence of this. In British heraldry a lone arrow normally points downward, but in the French tradition it points upwards. 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Arrow. The presence of an arrow in a coat of arms is reckoned to indicate “martial readiness” by Wade. 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 11A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

We should be surprised to find the stag or buck, noble quarry of many a mediaeval hunt, being illustrated in many a coat of arms. 13Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 69. It shares many of the poses to be found with the lion, but also one almost unique to the deer, grazing, as if the animal is still unaware of the hunter’s approach. 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Deer. In common with all symbols related to the hunt we probably need look further for their intended meaning than the pleasure taken by the holder in such pursuits! 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P30

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Gibb Name

Gibb Origin:

England, Scotland

Origin of Gibb:

This name is one of the shortened forms of the famous ancient English personal name “Gilbert,” which was brought into England by the Normans after the invasion of the year 1066. The Norman version of the name was “Gisleberth” listed in the Domesday Book of 1086. The meanings of names were “bright maturity”, and written with the chosen Germanic components “gisil,” which means gentle youth and rarely the word “hostage,” with “berht,” which means shiny, popular. Gilbert developed into a very famous name in England among the Middle Ages, with the popularity of St. Gilbert of Sempringham (1085-1189), the creator of the local English solitary form. As a personal name the formation of Gilbert, “Gibb,” was first listed in the Pipe Rolls of Nottinghamshire of 1179, as Gibbe de Huckenhale. The wedding of George Gibb and Katherine Gould in September 1668, at Harefield, Middlesex.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Gibby, Gibbi, Gibbo, Gibba, Gibbe, Gibbu, Gib, Gibbie, Gibbey, Gibbah.

England:

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Winc Gibbe, which was dated 1290, in the “Ancient Deeds of Norfolk.” It was during the time of King Edward I, who was known to be the “The Hammer of the Scots,” 1272 – 1307.

Ireland:

People with the surname Gibb had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Gibb settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Gibb who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Andrew Gibb, who joined the “Gardiners” who purchased Long Isle from the civil North Americans in 1655. James Gibb, who arrived in Maryland in 1674. John Gibb, who came to East New Jersey in 1685.

Some of the people with the name Gibb who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Alexander Gibb, who arrived in Maryland in 1730.

Some of the individuals with the name Gibb who settled in the United States in the 19th century included James Gibb, who landed in America in 1801. John Gibb, who settled in Allegany (Allegheny) Division, Pennsylvania in 1823. David Gibb, who landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1841. Andrew Gibb, who arrived in Mississippi in 1844.

Canada:

Individuals with the surname Gibb settled in Canada in two different centuries respectively in 18th and 19th. Some of the people with the name Gibb who settled in Canada in the 18th century included Robert Gibb, who settled in Nova Scotia in 1750.

Some of the people with the name Gibb who settled in Canada in the 19th century included Hugh Gibb, at the age of 23, settled in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship “Bartley” in 1833.

Australia:

Some of the people with the name Gibb who settled in Australia in the 19th century included George Gibb, was a Scottish prisoner from Edinburgh, who shifted aboard the “Agamemnon” in April 1820, settling in New South Wales, Australia. William Gibb landed in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Lysander” in 1840. Henry William Gibb settled in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Fama” in 1841. James Gordon Gibb at the age of 41 and Elizabeth Gibb, at the age of 42, both arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Catherine” in the same year in 1851.

New Zealand:

Some of the people with the name Gibb who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included James Gibb at the age of 25 and Mary Gibb at the age of 19 both arrived in Lyttelton, New Zealand aboard the ship “Accrington” in the same year in 1863. John Gibb arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Asterope” in 1867. George Gibb at the age of 41 and Matilda Gibb, at the age of 41, both arrived in Wellington, New Zealand in the same year in 1874 aboard the ship “Salisbury.”

Here is the population distribution of the last name Gibb: United States 4,704; England 4,436; Taiwan 290; Australia 2,262; Scotland 2,756; Canada 2,340; South Africa 2,082; Germany 538; Northern Ireland 238; New Zealand 1,148.

Notable People:

Alexander Gibb (1872–1958), was a Scottish engineer.

Ali Gibb (born 1976), is an English football player.

Andy Gibb (1958–1988), was an English-born Australian musician.

Gibb Family Gift Ideas

Browse Gibb family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: (granted to Thomas A. Gibb, Esq.). Blazon: Gules a cubit arm erect grasping an arrow in bend sinister, point downwards, between four mullets in cross or. Crest— Issuant from a wreath of cinquefoils vert a stag's head or, couped gules attired argent.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Arrow
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
11. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
13. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 69
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Deer
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P30