Gillman Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Gillman Family Coat of Arms

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Gillman Coat of Arms Meaning

Gillman Name Origin & History

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Gillman Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Gillman blazon are the nag’s head, hand and leg. The two main tinctures (colors) are or and sable.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 2A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? Nevertheless, real animals 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P191 are perhaps one of the most common sights on coats of arms, especially animals of European origin. The horse Is a typical example of these.The Nagbeing an affectionate term for a less-than-pedigree horse!

The hand, unless we are told otherwise is a dexter (right) hand shown palm outwards and fingers upwards.8A Glossary of Terms used in Heraldry, J.B. Parker, 1894 P305. It demonstrates faith, sincerity and justice, and in the form of two right hands clasped can mean union or alliance9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W Cecil Wade 1898 P92. There is a special form called the “Hand of Ulster” which is a sinister hand gules on an argent background (a left hand, red upon white). Originally the Badge of Ulster, the Province of Northern Ireland, it has come to be used as an addition to existing arms, in an escutcheon (small shield) or canton (small square) to indicate that the holder is also a Baronet.10Heraldry Historical and Popular, Charles Boutell, 1864 P56

Heraldry is a human art, by and for people and it is not surprising that people themselves are frequently depicted in arms 11Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P174. Often these are images of knights and men-at-arms, or individual limbs, such as the “three armoured right arms argent” shown in the arms of Armstrong 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 60. As well as the nobility however, we also see both the mundane, ploughmen, fishermen and reapers; and the exotic in the form of club wielding savages and the Moorish or Saracen gentleman with his decorative wreathed turban 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P168.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Gillman Name

Gillman Origin:

England, France

Origin of Gillman:

This surname is associated with Olde French origins before the 9th century. It is acquired from the name “Guillemin,” the Norman Williemin, and after sometime it changed into English William. Today this surname is listed in various spelling forms like Gillman, Gilman, Guillerman, Gellman, Gelman, Wellman, Wellerman, Willman, Williman, Willment, and several more. The first documentation of all “Wilelminus” is in the city of Oxford for the year 1220, and as Gilmyn in the 1279 Hundred Rolls of London, suggest that vocabulary replaced the ending from “min” to man.” The documentation indicates the increasing diversity over the centuries. William Gilleman is listed in Kent in 1317, Matilda Gelemyne in 1427 in Cambridge, Thomas Wylman in Yorkshire in 1524, and Richard Williman, also in Yorkshire, in 1544.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Gilliman, Gillmann, Gilleman, Giellman, Gillaman, Gillmane, Gilman, Gilliaman, Gilmany, Gellman.

England:

The name Gillman first originated in Norfolk where they held a family seat from ancient times and were donated estates by Duke William of Normandy, their true King, for their notable service at the Campaign of Hastings in 1066 A.D.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of John Wilemyn, in the Hundred Rolls of the City of London in the year 1275. It was during the time of King Edward I, who was known to be the “The Hammer of the Scots,” dated 1272 – 1307. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

Ireland:

People with the surname Gillman had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Gillman settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Gillman who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Edward Gillman of Norfolk who settled in Hingham in 1638 with his wife, three slaves, three sons and two daughters. Edward Gillman, who landed in Hingham, Massachusetts in 1638. Richard Gillman landed in Virginia in 1653. Thomas Gillman, who came to Virginia in 1680.

Some of the people with the name Gillman who settled in the United States in the 18th century included John Gillman, who arrived in Maryland in 1755. Verena Gillman, who came to Caroline in 1762, Adolph Gillman, who arrived in Philadelphia in 1774. Francis Gillman, who arrived in New York in 1777.

Some of the people with the name Gillman who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Christian Gillman at the age of 58, landed in Missouri in 1846. Caroline Gillman, who arrived in New York, NY in 1847. I Gillman came in San Francisco, California in 1850. John Gillman at the age of 22, landed in New York, NY in 1855. E Gillman came in San Francisco, California in 1855.

Canada:

Some of the people with the name Gillman who settled in Canada in the 18th century included Ezekiel Gillman, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1749.

Some of the individuals with the name Gillman who settled in Canada in the 19th century included Elizabeth Gillman, who arrived in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1807. Elizabeth Gillman, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1807. Mary Gillman at the age of 21, arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1833 aboard the brig “Thomas Hanford” from Cork, Ireland.

Australia:

Some of the people with the name Gillman who settled in Australia in the 19th century included Thomas Gillman, was an English prisoner from Wiltshire aboard the “Asia” in October 1824, settling in New South Wales, Australia. Edward Gillman arrived in Holdfast Bay, Australia aboard the ship “Canton” in 1838.

New Zealand:

Some of the people with the name Gillman who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included Thomas R. Gillman, Harriet B. Gillman, Mary S. Gillman, George M. Gillman and Harry A. Gillman, all these people arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Annie Wilson” in the same year in 1863.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Gillman: United States 5,680; England 1,301; France 86; Australia 696; Scotland 105; Canada 322; South Africa 895; Turkey 140; New Zealand 244; Ireland 115.

Notable People:

Henry Gillman (1833–1915), was an American ethnologist.

Leonard Gillman (1917–2009), was a famous American mathematician.

Neil Gillman (born 1933), was an American priest and scholar.

Peter Gillman (born 1942), was a British author and professor.

Sid Gillman (1911–2003), was an American football referee.

Gillman Family Gift Ideas

Browse Gillman family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Foley, co. Hereford). Sa. a nag’s head erased or, betw. three dexter hands couped ar.
2) (Curriheen, co. Cork, bart., extinct 1815; Sir John St. Leger Gillman was so created 1 Oct. 1799). Motto—Non cantu sed actu. Sa. a dexter leg couped above the knee or. Crest—An eagle's head erased sa. holding in the beak a lion’s gamb erased or.
3) (The Retreat, Clonakilty, co. Cork; confirmed to Bennett Watkins Gillman, of that place, second son of Herbert Gillman, Esq., of Bennett's Grove). Motto—Non cantu sed actu. Same Arms, an annulet for diff. Crest—A griffin's head erased sa. charged with an annulet or, and holding in the beak a bear’s paw of the last.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
2. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P191
8. A Glossary of Terms used in Heraldry, J.B. Parker, 1894 P305
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W Cecil Wade 1898 P92
10. Heraldry Historical and Popular, Charles Boutell, 1864 P56
11. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P174
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 60
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P168