Gillum Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Gillum Family Coat of Arms

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Gillum Coat of Arms Meaning

Gillum Name Origin & History

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Gillum Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Gillum blazon are the chevron, dolpin and castle. The two main tinctures (colors) are sable and or.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 7A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.8The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

In the days before television and the internet it was a rare heraldic artist that had ever seen a dolphin for real, so we should not be surprised that the heraldic representation is not instantly recognisable. Despite this, we should not forget that these artists considered the dolphin to be the king of fish, playing the same role as the lion in the animal kingdom. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dolphin For reasons not immediately clear, Wade suggests that the dolphin was regarded as an “affectionate fish, fond of music”. 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P83

Architectural items, from individual components to entire buildings 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 92 feature frequently as charges In a coat of arms. Not surprisingly, considering the times from which many arms date, fortifications are common. The castle is perhaps second only to the tower in this usage, and often described in some detail as to its construction, the disposition of windows and so on. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Castle Continental examples also sometimes include attackers on scaling ladders. Wade tells us that the appearance of a castle indicates “granduer and solidity” and one can understand why. 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Gillum Name

Gillum Origin:

England, France

Origins of Gillum:

The surname of Gillum is said to be both a patronymic surname and a nickname that hails from the countries of England and France. Since the surname of Gillum is said to be is a patronymic name, meaning that the original bearer of the surname of Gillum was the son, grandson, or direct male descendant of a person who was well-known and notable within the community from which the name derived. Patronymic names often added the suffix of “-son” to the end of the male ancestor’s name, which was later shortened to the addition of an “-s.” In the country of Ireland, patronymic surnames often began with “O” or “Mac” to denote the meaning of “son of.” In the country of France, an “L” was added to the beginning of the male descendant’s name to denote “son of.” In the case of the surname of Gillum, this name was given to someone who was the son of William. The word itself can be traced to the word of “Wilhelm” which is comprised of both “wil” which can be translated to mean “desire” and the word of “helm” which can be translated to mean “helmet” or “protection.” This surname of Gillum is also used as a nickname throughout history. It is a common element of surnames throughout Europe that many of them originally derived from nicknames, as it was a very common practice in medieval times. In the beginning, nicknames were applied to people who had distinguishing characteristics, such as moral or mental peculiarities, a similar appearance to a bird or animal, a similar disposition to a bird or animal, occupation of an individual, their habits, or their manner of dress. In the case of the surname of Gillum, those who were the original bearers of this surname would have been prominent members of society, and who were regarded as the protectors in this society or community. Thus, the surname of Gillum would have either been given to the son of William, or a variant of this name, or someone who was considered to be a protector in the society. It is also possible that the surname of Gillum was given to someone who was the son of a protector in society.

Variations:

More common variations are: Gillium, Gillaum, Gilleum, Gilluim, Gillume, Gielume, Gillm, Gillaume, Gillam, Gillem, Gillim

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Gillum can be traced to the country of England. One person by the name of Peter Gillame was mentioned and recorded in the document known as the Calendar Letter Books of the City of London in the year of 1276. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King Edward I of England, who was known throughout the ages, and who was commonly referred to as one “Longshanks” or one “The Hammer of the Scots.” King Edward I was such named because of the horrors and hardships that he enacted on the people of Scotland throughout his reign, which lasted from the year of 1272 to the year of 1307. Those who bear the surname of Gillum are found in London.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Gillum: United States 5,651; New Zealand 121; England 75; Australia 26; India 3; Wales 2; Germany 2; South Korea 1; Philippines 1; Kuwait 1; Czech Republic 1; Sweden 1

Notable People:

Gary P. Gillum (born in 1944) who served as the Librarian Emeritus of Brigham Young University and who was also from the United States of America.

Andrew D. Gillum (born in 1979) who served as the city commissioner in Tallahassee, Florida, who was also from the United States of America.

Vern Gillum, who served as a television director from the United States of America.

William McKinley Gillum (1904-1966) who was known by the name of Jazz Gillum, and who was a harmonica player who played the blues, and who was from the United States of America.

Andrew Gillum, who served as an Alternate Delegate to the Democratic National Convention from the state of Florida in the year of 2004, and who was a Democratic politician from the United States of America.

Gillum Family Gift Ideas

Browse Gillum family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: (Middleton Hall, co. Northumberland). Blazon: Sable on a chevron or, between three dolphins hauriant proper as many castles. Crest—A dolphin, as in the arms.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
8. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dolphin
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P83
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 92
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Castle
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100