Which one is mine?

Sign Up For Our Newsletter

Sign up today for our newsletter and receive a free video explaining what a “coat of arms” is!

Origin, Meaning, Family History and Gillum Coat of Arms and Family Crest

Gillum Origin:

England, France

Origins of Gillum:

The surname of Gillum is said to be both a patronymic surname and a nickname that hails from the countries of England and France. Since the surname of Gillum is said to be is a patronymic name, meaning that the original bearer of the surname of Gillum was the son, grandson, or direct male descendant of a person who was well-known and notable within the community from which the name derived. Patronymic names often added the suffix of “-son” to the end of the male ancestor’s name, which was later shortened to the addition of an “-s.” In the country of Ireland, patronymic surnames often began with “O” or “Mac” to denote the meaning of “son of.” In the country of France, an “L” was added to the beginning of the male descendant’s name to denote “son of.” In the case of the surname of Gillum, this name was given to someone who was the son of William. The word itself can be traced to the word of “Wilhelm” which is comprised of both “wil” which can be translated to mean “desire” and the word of “helm” which can be translated to mean “helmet” or “protection.” This surname of Gillum is also used as a nickname throughout history. It is a common element of surnames throughout Europe that many of them originally derived from nicknames, as it was a very common practice in medieval times. In the beginning, nicknames were applied to people who had distinguishing characteristics, such as moral or mental peculiarities, a similar appearance to a bird or animal, a similar disposition to a bird or animal, occupation of an individual, their habits, or their manner of dress. In the case of the surname of Gillum, those who were the original bearers of this surname would have been prominent members of society, and who were regarded as the protectors in this society or community. Thus, the surname of Gillum would have either been given to the son of William, or a variant of this name, or someone who was considered to be a protector in the society. It is also possible that the surname of Gillum was given to someone who was the son of a protector in society.

Variations:

More common variations are: Gillium, Gillaum, Gilleum, Gilluim, Gillume, Gielume, Gillm, Gillaume, Gillam, Gillem, Gillim

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Gillum can be traced to the country of England. One person by the name of Peter Gillame was mentioned and recorded in the document known as the Calendar Letter Books of the City of London in the year of 1276. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King Edward I of England, who was known throughout the ages, and who was commonly referred to as one “Longshanks” or one “The Hammer of the Scots.” King Edward I was such named because of the horrors and hardships that he enacted on the people of Scotland throughout his reign, which lasted from the year of 1272 to the year of 1307. Those who bear the surname of Gillum are found in London.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Gillum: United States 5,651; New Zealand 121; England 75; Australia 26; India 3; Wales 2; Germany 2; South Korea 1; Philippines 1; Kuwait 1; Czech Republic 1; Sweden 1

Notable People:

Gary P. Gillum (born in 1944) who served as the Librarian Emeritus of Brigham Young University and who was also from the United States of America.

Andrew D. Gillum (born in 1979) who served as the city commissioner in Tallahassee, Florida, who was also from the United States of America.

Vern Gillum, who served as a television director from the United States of America.

William McKinley Gillum (1904-1966) who was known by the name of Jazz Gillum, and who was a harmonica player who played the blues, and who was from the United States of America.

Andrew Gillum, who served as an Alternate Delegate to the Democratic National Convention from the state of Florida in the year of 2004, and who was a Democratic politician from the United States of America.

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: (Middleton Hall, co. Northumberland). Blazon: Sable on a chevron or, between three dolphins hauriant proper as many castles. Crest—A dolphin, as in the arms.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


References

  • 1 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
  • 2 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
  • 3 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
  • 4 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
  • 5 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
  • 6 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 7 A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
  • 8 The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
  • 9 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
  • 10 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dolphin
  • 11 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P83
  • 12 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 92
  • 13 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Castle
  • 14 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100