Goodchild Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Goodchild Family Coat of Arms

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Goodchild Coat of Arms Meaning

Goodchild Name Origin & History

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Goodchild Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Goodchild blazon are the parrot, annulet, chevron and bezant. The three main tinctures (colors) are vert, or and sable .

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The parrot is a fairly recent usage, but the ancient form of popinjay was more common 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Parrot. Commonly coloured vert (green) with beak and legs gules (red) it is usually depicted with a high degree of realism. 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P249

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the annulet is a good example, being a circular ring of any colour. They also appear interlaced or one within the other, both of which are very pleasing additions. Wade believes that these were one of the symbols of ancient pilgrims. 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P19

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 14A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.15The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Goodchild Name

Goodchild Origin:

England

Origins of Goodchild:

This unique and interesting name has two possible sources and modern-day descendants of the name are likely to be descended from either source. The first of these is a mainly southern English origin, from the old particular name “Godechild,” acquired from the Old English pre 7th Century, “Godcild,” from “God,” which means good and “cild,” which means child. The name may also have used in the Middle Ages as a nickname for a good person. The second origin of the new surname is an old nickname for a person who was the godchild of an important representative of the community and this suggested by the first documentation of the name. One Richard Goodchild and his son “Chirstmas” were early settlers in Virginia, being noted there in 1623.

Variations:

More common variations are: Hgoodchild, Godchild, Goudchild.

England:

The surname Goodchild was first found in Durham where they held a family seat from very ancient times. Some say well before the Norman Invasion and the entrance of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 AD.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Henry Goddechild, dated about 1211, in the “Curia Rolls,” Essex. It was during the time of King John who was known to be the “Lackland,” dated 1199 – 1216. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Goodchild had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Goodchild landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Goodchild who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Richard Goodchild, who landed in Virginia in 1622. Richard Goodchild who settled in Virginia in 1623 with his wife and daughter. Robert Goodchild, who arrived in Maryland in 1661.

People with the surname Goodchild who landed in the United States in the 18th century included William Goodchild settled in New England in 1715. Elizabeth and Hester Goodchild settled in Virginia in 1721. Francis Goodchild, who arrived in Virginia in 1727.

The following century saw more Goodchild surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Goodchild who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Henry Goodchild, who landed in New York in 1827. William Goodchild at the age of 22, landed in New York, NY in 1855. James and Robert Goodchild arrived in Philadelphia between 1840 and 1860.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Goodchild who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Catherine Goodchild, an English prisoner from Lancaster, who shifted aboard the “Angelina” in April 1844, settling in Van Diemen‘s Land, Australia. Rebecca Goodchild arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Samuel Boddington” in 1850.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Goodchild: England 5,028; United States 1,330; Australia 1,097; South Africa 895; Canada 542; Scotland 197; Germany 134; Wales 124; New Zealand 109; France 61.

Notable People:

Chloe Goodchild is a singer, actress and recording artist.

David John Goodchild (born 17 September 1976) is an old English cricket player. Goodchild was a right-handed opening batsman who bowled right-arm medium pace.

Doreen Goodchild (1900–1998), was a South Australian artist.

Gary Goodchild (born 1958), was an English football player.

George Goodchild (1888–1969), was a British author.

Jim Goodchild (1892–1950), was an English football player.

John Goodchild (1851–1914), was a British surgeon, poet and spiritual, writer of Light of the West.

John C. Goodchild (1898–1980), was a South Australian artist.

Johnny Goodchild (born 1939), ia an English football player.

Mike Goodchild (born 1944), is a British-American geographer.

Peter Goodchild (born 1939), is a BBC television farmer and director.

Ronald Goodchild (1910–1998), was an Anglican priest of Kensington

Tim Goodchild is an award winning international set and clothes developer from Great Britain.

William Goodchild (born 1964), was a British singer and writer.

Goodchild Family Gift Ideas

Browse Goodchild family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Pallion, co. Durham). Motto—Vincit omnia veritas. Ar. on a chev. sa. betw. three parrots vert beaked and legged gu. as many annulets or. Crest—A parrot, as in the arms.
2) (granted to Thomas Goodchild, of London, and of Valetta, Malta, 29 Sept. 1808). Per pale erminois and erm. on a chev. az. betw. three parrots vert, beaked and legged gu. as many bezants. Crest—A pellet, thereon a parrot, as in the arms, in the beak an annulet gu.
3) Ar. on a chev. sa. three bezants.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Parrot
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P249
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P19
14. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
15. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45