Grape Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Grape Family Coat of Arms

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Grape Coat of Arms Meaning

Grape Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Grape. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Grape Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Grape blazon are the pheon, talbot and stag. The two main tinctures (colors) are vert and or.

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89. The pheon is a specific type of arrow head with barbs and darts and hence quite distinctive in appearance. 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pheon Like the other symbols related to arrows, Wade suggests the symbolism is that of “readiness for military service”. 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111

Many breeds of dog appear in coats of arms, reflecting their status as man’s closet companion. The talbot is a hunting dog akin to a terrier, and usually illustrated in a lifelike style and eager pose. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog In common with the other heraldic dogs, Wade suggests that their presence should suggest “courage, vigilance and loyal fidelity”. 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P68 Others might say we need look no further than a pleasure in the hunt and the affection for this sturdy breed.

We should be surprised to find the stag or buck, noble quarry of many a mediaeval hunt, being illustrated in many a coat of arms. 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 69. It shares many of the poses to be found with the lion, but also one almost unique to the deer, grazing, as if the animal is still unaware of the hunter’s approach. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Deer. In common with all symbols related to the hunt we probably need look further for their intended meaning than the pleasure taken by the holder in such pursuits! 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P30

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Grape Name

The distinguished German surname Grape acquired from the Old High German “graban,” meaning “to dig.” The name was originally used to indicate “a digger of graves or ditches.”  Spelling variations of this family name include: Grabner, Grabber, Graeber, Graebner, Gravner, Grabbne, Grabne, Grubner, Grappner, Grapner, Grabere, Graben, Grabel, Grabert, Grable, Grabnere, Grabnen, Grabnel, Grabbere, Grabben, Grabbel, Greber, Grebere, Greben, Graebner, Graebnere, Graebnen, Graebber, Graebbere, Graebben, Craver and much more.

The surname Grape first found in Austria, where in old times the Graber family played an important role within the region’s feudal society.  The name Grabner became prominent in local affairs and often intermarried with other great families, some of whom played important roles in the territorial disputes of the period. Some of the first settlers of this family name or some of its variants were like Christian Grabert, who settled in Louisiana in 1724.  Hans Graber, who settled in Pennsylvania in 1749. Emanuel Grabner, who arrived in Carolina in 1752.

Grape Family Gift Ideas

Browse Grape family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: (New Windsor, co. Berks; granted 1764). Blazon: Vert a talbot pass, in base or, in chief two pheons of the last. Crest—A stag erminois, collared gu. grazing on a mount vert.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pheon
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P68
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 69
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Deer
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P30