Grumley Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Grumley Family Coat of Arms

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Grumley Coat of Arms Meaning

Grumley Name Origin & History

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Grumley Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Grumley blazon are the mural crown, anchor and pelican. The three main tinctures (colors) are vert, or and azure .

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Crowns are frequently observed in Heraldry 9Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P184, but we should not make the mistake of assuming that these are always on Royal arms 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P138. Many of the orders of nobility across Europe were entitled to wear crowns and coronets, Dukes, Earls, Viscounts and Barons in England each had their own distinctive headwear 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P350. The mural crown exhibits decoration rather like brickwork, and has battlements on top. It is said to have been award by the Roman legions to the first who breached the walls of a besieged town or fortress. 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P142

A wide variety of inanimate objects 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281 appear in coats of arms, so of them still recognisable today, others now rather obscure. The images used are often simplified and stylised, the anchor is a typical case. For any meaning, we need look no further than a nautical or sea-faring heritage. Indeed, some arms go into great detail of the colours and arrangement of the stock, stem, cables and flutes of the anchor reflecting a detailed knowledge of the form and use of this device. 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:anchor.

The pelican is often associated with parenthood and “devoted and self sacrificing charity”. 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P77-78 It is almost always shown with its young in their nest (in its piety) or pricking its breast in readiness to feed its young with its own blood (vulning herself. 16A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pelican

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Grumley Name

Grumley Origin:

England

Origins of Grumley:

According to the early recordings of the spellings of the name, this interesting and unique name was listed as Grimley, Grimlee, Grimbly, Gremley, Grymley, Grymly, Gromley, and Grumley, this is an English surname. It is locational from a place called Grimley in the division of Worcestershire, and noted as “Grimanleh” in the famous Domesday Book of 1086. The placename acquires from the pre 7th century particular name and means “Grima’s farm”. Locational surnames are usually “from” names. That is to say, names given as easy classification to people who had departed from their original hamlets and shifted to any other place. Spelling being at best unusual and local dilaects very thick often lead to the advancement of “sounds like” spellings. In this example, recordings of the surname from different remaining parish records contain Margarett Grimley, who was named in January 1581, at Harborough Magna, Warwickshire, Morgan Grumley who married Rose Hewett at St Margarets Westminster, in June 1656, in the “reign” of Olver Cromwell, and Sarah Gromley who married John Beckham in the parish of St Clement Danes, Westminster, in September 1799. Surnames became necessary when governments started personal taxation. In England, this known as Poll Tax. All over the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to “develop” often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling. Many variations of the name Grumley have been found, including as Grimley, Grimly, Grimleigh, Grimlie, Grymley and much more.

Variations:

More common variations are: Gruhmley, Graumley, Grumly, Grmley, Grimley, Gormley, Crumley, Gromley, Gramley, Gremley.

England:

The surname Grumley first appeared in Worcestershire at Grimley, a hamlet and local church, now in the Malvern Hills District, originally in the union of Martley, Lower division of the hundred of Oswaldslow. An old Saxon stronghold, the first listing of the place name was in the 9th century when it noted as Grimanleage. By the Domesday Book of 1086, the place name had developed to Grimanleh and consisted of a mill and one-half of a fishery of eels. The place name literally means “wood or glade haunted by a spirit or fairy,” from the Old English words “grima” and “leah.”

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Grumley had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Some of the people with the surname Grumley who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included William Grumley at the age of 37, arrived in Missouri in the year 1845.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Grumley: United States 254; Australia 251; Ireland 55; England 48; Canada 11; New Zealand 7; Northern Ireland 2; United Arab Emirates 2; Thailand 1; Oman 1.

Notable People:

Michael Grumley (1942–1988) was an American author and artist. He was born in Bettendorf, Iowa. He got a B.S. Degree with a major in Philosophy from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in June 1964. He was a founding member of The Violet Quill. His partner, another founding member of the Quill, was Robert Ferro. He composed a regularly appearing column Uptown for the New York Native. Following their deaths, the Ferro-Grumley Foundation, which distributes their estate, formed and organized the annual Ferro-Grumley Award for LGBT fiction in conjunction with Publishing Triangle.

Grumley Family Gift Ideas

Browse Grumley family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Reg. Ulster's Office). Ar. on a fess cotised az. betw. three pelicans ppr. a mural crown or.
2) (Ireland). Vert a bend or, betw. two anchors ar. Crest—A vine branch ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
9. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P184
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P138
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P350
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P142
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:anchor
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P77-78
16. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pelican