Haines Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Haines Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Haines Coat of Arms Meaning

Haines Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Haines. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

haines coat of arms

Haines Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Haines blazon are the annulet, crescent, greyhound and bezant. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, azure and or .

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.1The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the annulet is a good example, being a circular ring of any colour. They also appear interlaced or one within the other, both of which are very pleasing additions. Wade believes that these were one of the symbols of ancient pilgrims. 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P19

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

Unlike many of the creatures to be found in heraldry, the Greyhound is shown in a very natural aspect and lifelike poses. 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P204 It is probably the most common member of the dog family to be found in arms 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog, and Wade suggests that we see in its appearance the suggestion of“courage, vigilance and loyal fidelity”. 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P69

Haines Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Haines Name

Haines Origin:

Ireland, England, Scotland

Origins of Haines:

The surname of Haines has possible roots in Scottish, Irish, and English cultures. There are two possible origins of the surname of Haines. The first possible origin of the surname of Haines can be found as a patronymic surname from the personal given name of “Hain” which comes from the Old German word of “Hagano” which itself comes from a byname meaning “hawthorn.” The second possible source of the origin of the surname of Haines is that it is a locational surname. This means that it was often taken by the Lord or owner of the land from which the name derives. Others who may have take a locational surname are people who have migrated out of the area to seek out work. The easiest way to identify someone who was a stranger at that time was by the name of their birthplace. In the case of the surname of Haines, the locations from which the original bearers of the surname may hail are found within the country of England. The location of this place is found within the county of Bedfordshire, and it is a place called “Haynes.” This name itself derived from the Old English Pre 7th Century word of “haga-nes” which can be translated to mean “the headland on which a hawthorn tree stood,” or possibly from the Old English word of “haegen” which can be translated to mean “the enclosure.” There are many spellings of the town or village of Haynes, which are all recorded in the Doomsday Book of 1086, which was a document that was supposed to encompass the “Great Surevey” of England. Some examples of the spelling in the Doomsday Book include Hagenes, and Hagnes.

Variations:

More common variations are: Hains, Haine, Haynes, Hain, Hayne, Heynes, Hayn, Hainnes, Hayines

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Haines can be traced to the country of England. One person by the name of Alice Heynes was mentioned in the Subsidy Rolls of the County of Somerset in the year of 1327. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King Edward III of England, who was known throughout the ages, and commonly referred to as “The Father of the Navy.” King Edward III of England ruled from the year of 1327 to the year of 1377. Other mentions of the surname of Haines within the country of England include one William ate Hayene who was also mentioned in the Subsidy Rolls of Somerset in the year of 1327, and one Margery Haynes who was recorded in the Essex Country Rolls in the year of 1352. Those who are known to bear the surname of Haines can be found throughout the country of England. The areas with the larger populations of those who carry the surname of Haines can be found in Kent, Devon, Dorset, Yorkshire, Lancashire, and Sussex counties. There is also a high concentration of those who are known to bear the surname of Haines within the areas in and around the city of London.

Scotland:

Those who are known to carry the surname of Haines within the country of Scotland can be found in Lanarkshire.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Haines: United States 33,776; England 10,766; Australia 4,427; Canada 3,937; South Africa 1,972; Wales 1,287; New Zealand 1,004; Scotland 335; Argentina 254; France 233

Notable People:

John Haines (1924-2011) who was an educator and poet from America who held the title of Alaska’s Poet Laureate for the Fellow of the Academy of American Poets in the year 1997

Larry Haines (1918-2008) who was born with the name Larry Hecht who was an actor from America who was both nominated for multiple Tony Awards as well as won three Daytime Emmys and he was best-known for his role in The Odd Couple in the year 1968

Randa Haines who was born in the year 1945 and who is a director and producer from America who has been the recipient of the Directors Guild of America Award three times as well as having been nominated for a Primetime Emmy

Harry Luther Haines (1880-1947) who was a politician from America who was the representative for the Pennsylvania 22nd Congressional District tot eh United States House of Representatives from the year 1931 to the year 1939

Townsend Haines who was a politician from America who served as the Secretary of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania from the year 1884 to the year 1850

Haines Family Gift Ideas

Browse Haines family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More haines Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (co. Berks). Ar. a fesse az. bezantee betw. three annulets of the second.
2) Gu. three crescents paly wavy ar. and az. Crest: On a crescent an arrow in pale all ppr.
3) Or, on a fesse gu. three bezants in chief a grey­hound courant az. collared ar. Crest—An eagle displ. az. semee of estoiles ar.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P19
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P204
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P69