Hair Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Hair Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Hair Coat of Arms Meaning

Hair Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Hair. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

hair coat of arms

Hair Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Hair blazon are the thistle, bars and lion. The three main tinctures (colors) are argent, or and gules .

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.6The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

The thistle as a symbol is inevitably associated with Scotland, although more often as a badge rather than appearing as an item upon a shield. 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P270 Despite its prickly reputation the images of this flowering plant are very striking and they are usually shown with leaves to either side in quite an accurate representation. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:thistle

The bar is a thin, horizontal stripe across the centre of the shield 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bar, usually in groups of two or three (any more and there would be confusion with barry, a treatment of horizontal lines of alternating colours). Bars can be a distinctive and easily recognised device, early examples include those awarded by Henry III of England to the family MAUDYT Argent, two bars gules.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 13Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 14Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 15A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

Hair Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Hair Name

Hair Origin:

England, Ireland, Scotland

Origins of Hair:

The surname of Hair has many possible origins from which it can be derived. The first possible origin of the surname of Hair is that it hailed from the Old English Pre 7th word “hara” which can be translated to mean “the hare.” Thus the surname of Hair was given as a nickname. It is a common element of surnames throughout Europe that many of them originally derived from nicknames, as it was a very common practice in medieval times. In the beginning, nicknames were applied to people who had distinguishing characteristics, such as moral or mental peculiarities, a similar appearance to a bird or animal, a similar disposition to a bird or animal, occupation of an individual, their habits, or their manner of dress. In the case of the surname of Hair, this surname was given to someone who was a quick runner. The second possible origin of the surname of Hair is that it was a locational surname. This means that it was often taken by the Lord or owner of the land from which the name derives. Others who may have take a locational surname are people who have migrated out of the area to seek out work. The easiest way to identify someone who was a stranger at that time was by the name of their birthplace. In the case of the surname of Hair, the locations from which this surname derived can be found throughout the countries of England, Ireland, and Scotland. The final possible origin of the surname of Hair is that it is a topographical surname. A topographical surname is used to describe someone who lived on or near a residential landmark. This landmark could be either man made or natural, and would have been easily identifiable in the area from which it hailed, thus making the people who lived near it easily distinguished. In the case of the surname of Hair, it can be derived from the word “haer” which can be translated to mean “stony ground.”

Variations:

More common variations are: Haire, Heair, Hairi, Hayir, Haira, Hairr, Hairy, Haiar, Hairu, Hairo, Hawir, Hoair, Hawir, Haiir

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Hair can be traced to the country of England. One person by the name of Walter le Hare, who was mentioned in the document known as the Pipe Rolls of the county of Surrey in the year of 1166. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of King Henry II of England, who was commonly known throughout the ages as one “The Builder.” King Henry II of England ruled from the year of 1154 to the year of 1189.

United States of America:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Hair within the United States of America was one Samuel Hair, who arrived in the state of New York in the year of 1719, at the age of 33.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Hair: United States 9,804; Brazil 3,657; England 2,221; Indonesia 1,585; Vietnam 1,391; South Africa 1,059; Australia 1,045; Morocco 537; Scotland 525; France 392

Notable People:

T. E. Hair, who served as a Delegate to the Democratic National Convention from the state of Arkansas in the year of 1884, and who was a Democratic politician from America.

Sarah Hair, who served as a Delegate to the Democratic National Convention from the state of Hawaii in the year of 2004, and who was Democratic politician from America.

Mattox Hair, who served as a Candidate for the U.S. Representative from the state of Florida in the 4th District in the year of 1992, and who was a Democratic politician from America.

Lacy Hair, who served as an Alternate Delegate to the Democratic National Convention from the state of North Carolina in the year of 1964, and who was a Democratic politician from America.

John S. Hair, who served as an Alternate Delegate to the Republican National Convention from the state of Illinois in the year of 1904, and who was a Republican politician from America.

J. W. Hair, who served as an Alternate Delegate to the Republican National Convention from the state of Mississippi in the year of 1916, and who was a Republican politician from America.

George W. Hair, who served as a Delegate to the Republican National Convention from the state of North Carolina in the year of 1956, and who was a Republican politician from America.

Hair Family Gift Ideas

Browse Hair family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More hair Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Scotland). Ar. a chief sa.
2) (Armagh Manor, co. Fermanagh; confirmed to James Haire, Esq., son and heir of Robert Haire, Esq., Q.C., and grandson of James Haire, of Armagh, and their descendants). Motto—In te Domine speravi. Gu. two bars or, on a chief indented ar. a thistle ppr. Crest—A lion ramp. ar. supporting the Roman fasces ppr.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P270
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:thistle
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bar
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
13. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
14. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
15. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60