Hallman Coat of Arms

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hallman coat of arms, hallman family crest
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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: (co. Devon, 1607). Blazon: Vert a chevron argent guttee de sang between three pheons or. Crest—A crossbow erect or, between two wings gules.

Origin, Meaning, Family History and Hallman Coat of Arms and Family Crest

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Hallman Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Hallman blazon are the chevron and pheon. The two main tinctures (colors) are vert and guttee de sang .

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 4A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.5The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89. The pheon is a specific type of arrow head with barbs and darts and hence quite distinctive in appearance. 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pheon Like the other symbols related to arrows, Wade suggests the symbolism is that of “readiness for military service”. 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
5. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pheon
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111