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Hayman Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Hayman blazon are the marlet, moor and cinquefoil. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, sable and argent .

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 1. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 2.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 3. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 4. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 5.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 6. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 7.

The martlett is by far the most common bird to appear in British Heraldry, perhaps only equalled by the eagle, however it is not a species ever to be found in an ornithologists handbook! The word itself is though to have come from the French word merlette, the female blackbird and itself a similar type of charge used in French Heraldry. 8. Over time the image has become quite stylised, without visible legs or distinctive feathers. Wade suggests that this representation arises from “the appearance of the bird of paradise to ancient travellers” 9. Other bird species may be named in coats of arms (cornish chough is a frequent example) but in actual execution their appearance is often indistinguishable from the martlet.

The head of a Moor is frequently borne on the arms of those at one time involved with crusades, possibly associated with some “deeds of prowess”. 10 The head is shown typically in a realistic fashion but the precise details are left to the imagination and skills of the artist! 11

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 12. The cinquefoil is also of this type, being drawn, at least a little, realistically and often to very pleasing effect. It is shown as five-petalled flower, each petal quite rounded but with a distinct tip. It is sometimes pierced with a hole in the centre and usually appears on its own, without any leaves. 13 It has no fixed colour but can appear in any of the available heraldic tinctures.

Origin, Meaning, Family History and Hayman Coat of Arms and Family Crest

Listed as Hayman, Haysman, Haseman, Haisman and Hazeman, this is an English surname.  It has many possible origins.  It may be professional and explain a hay merchant, or it may be geographical and show a person who resided by an area of land fenced for agriculture. More common variations are: Haymain, Haymann, Haymana, Hayaman, Hayuman, Haymean, Hayeman, Hyman, Haman, Heayeman.

The surname Hayman first appeared in Warwickshire where one of the first records of the name was Walter Heyman who noted there in the Premium Rolls of Warwickshire in 1332. The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of William Hayman,  dated 1312, in the “ Catalogue of Ancient Deeds”. It was during the reign ofKing Edward 11nd,  dated 1307-1327.  Surname all over the country became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.  It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.  Surnames all over the country began to develop with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

Some of the people with the name Hayman who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included William Hayman, who settled in Barbados in 1634.  William Hayman, aged 36, who landed in St Christopher in 1634.  Jer Hayman, who arrived in Virginia in 1653.  Elizabeth Hayman, who landed in Virginia in 1660. Ed Hayman, who landed in Virginia in 1665. People with the surname Hayman who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Captain Hayman, who settled in Boston in 1765.  William Hayman, who arrived in Philadelphia in 1774. Some of the people with the surname Hayman who arrived in the Canada in the 18th century included Mr William Hayman U.E. (b. 1757) born in Argyleshire, Scotland who settled in Country Harbour, Guysborough County, Nova Scotia c. 1783, the Tatamagouche, Nova Scotia he served in the Royal North Carolina Regiment, married to Margaret Maillard they had 12 children.

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(Myrtle Grove and South Abbey, Youghal, co. Cork; a branch of a Somersetshire family, derived from the younger of two brothers, Samuel Hatman, who went to Ireland in the suite of the Dulce of Ormonde, Lord Lieutenant 1662, and settled in the town of Youghal, where he purchased, in 1670, part of the estates of Sir Walter Raleigh). Motto—Coelum non solum. Argent on a chevron engrailed azure between three martlets sable as many cinquefoils pierced or. Crests—1st: A demi Moor, full-faced, wreathed round the temples, holding in the dexter hand a rose slipped and leaved all proper; 2nd: A martlet sable.

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Comments

Douglas Hayman commented on 14-Oct-2018
My name is douglas hayman. Please contact me on my email d.Hayman12@live.com or send me your facebook. I would love to find the original coat of arms of hayman. My dad has a copy but is rather busy.
HANNAH HAYMAN commented on 10-Apr-2017
This so such a racist updated drawing who ever did it should be ashamed I'm a hayman and I'm very disappointed I wouldn't dare where any of the products even if I was paid , you should delete this instead of having it represent the hayman name, disgusted.

References

  • 1 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
  • 2 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
  • 3 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
  • 4 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
  • 5 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
  • 6 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 7 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
  • 8 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet
  • 9 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79
  • 10 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P93
  • 11 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Head
  • 12 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
  • 13 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cinquefoil