Jackson Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Jackson Family Coat of Arms

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Jackson Coat of Arms Meaning

Jackson Name Origin & History

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Jackson Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Jackson blazon are the pheon, greyhound, cinquefoil and lion. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, or and sable .

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89. The pheon is a specific type of arrow head with barbs and darts and hence quite distinctive in appearance. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pheon Like the other symbols related to arrows, Wade suggests the symbolism is that of “readiness for military service”. 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111

Unlike many of the creatures to be found in heraldry, the Greyhound is shown in a very natural aspect and lifelike poses. 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P204 It is probably the most common member of the dog family to be found in arms 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog, and Wade suggests that we see in its appearance the suggestion of“courage, vigilance and loyal fidelity”. 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P69

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 16A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The cinquefoil is also of this type, being drawn, at least a little, realistically and often to very pleasing effect. It is shown as five-petalled flower, each petal quite rounded but with a distinct tip. It is sometimes pierced with a hole in the centre and usually appears on its own, without any leaves. 17A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cinquefoil It has no fixed colour but can appear in any of the available heraldic tinctures.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Jackson Name

Jackson Origin:

England, Scotland

Origins of Name:

The surname of Jackson is a patronymic surname that comes from the given personal names of John, or Jacques. Both of these personal names stem from the Hebrew given name “Yochanan” which can be translated to mean “Jehovah has favored me” or “Jehovah has favored me with a son.” This personal name was first brought to England by the Crusaders who were returning from the Holy Land in the 12th Century. Since this surname is patronymic, it implies that the original bearer was the “son of” someone who bore the name of Jack. However, with this surname of Jackson, it often meant “son of James” as Jack is a diminutive of James.

Variations:

More common variations are: Jacksohn, Jacksson, Jackison, Jacksoni, Jacksone, Jjacksonn, Jaackson, Jacksoon, Jaxon, Jacson, Jagson

History:

Scotland:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Jackson in the country of Scotland appeared in the year 1409. One person by the name of Andrew Jacson was appointed to the rank of burgess of the city of Aberdeen. Other mentions of this surname of Jackson in the country of Scotland include William Jaksone, who was named as the burgess of Glasgow in the year 1447, and Wylly Jaksone in the year 1454.

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Jackson was found in the country of England in the 14th Century. One person by the name of Adam Jackessone was mentioned in the Subsidy Rolls of Suffolk in the year 1327. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of King Edward III of England, who was known as, and commonly called throughout the ages as one “Edward of Windsor,” and who ruled from the year 1327 to the year 1377. Other mentions of the surname of Jackson include one Adam Jackson, who was named as a witness in the Assize Court of Staffordshire in the year 1351, and Willelmus Jackson (Jacson) who was mentioned in the Poll Tax returns of the county of Yorkshire in the year 1379. The surname of Jackson is very popular in the country of England, and can be found throughout the country. The areas with a higher concentration of those who bear the surname of Jackson are Cambridgeshire, Yorkshire, and in County Suffolk.

United States of America:

Throughout the 17th Century, the dissatisfaction of European citizens with their home countries was steadily growing. There was word of a New World that had yet to be explored called The New World, or The Colonies. Today this New World is known as The United States of America. The Colonies promised a freedom from religious persecution, the availability of land, and better, more sanitary living conditions, and the promise of a better, more stable government. This large movement of people from people from Europe to The New World is known as the European Migration. Among these European citizens were people who bore the surname of Jackson. The first recorded person to migrate to the New World with the surname of Jackson was one person by the name of Barnard Jackson, who arrived in the state of Virginia in the year 1623. In the year 1635, John Jackson, Margaret Jackson, Robert Jackson, and Henry Jackson all settled down in the city of Boston, Massachusetts. There are many people in the United States who bear the surname of Jackson. The areas with the largest concentration of people who carry this surname are in the states of Mississippi, Texas, Alabama, Georgia, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and New York.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Jackson: United States 699,284; England 88,476; Tanzania 77,514; Nigeria 61,134; Australia 34,267; Uganda 32,860; Canada 31,901; South Africa 29,807; Brazil 25,531; Kenya 20,009

Notable People:

President Andrew Jackson (1767-1845) who served as the President of the United States from the year 1829 to the year 1837

John David Jackson (1925-2016) who was a professor of physics professor emeritus at the University of California, Berkley from Canada, who later became an American citizen

Anna Jane “Anne” Jackson (1925-2016) who was an Obie Award winner from America, who also was nominated for a Tony Award, and was an actress on TV, the stage, and the screen

Mr. Percy Thornton Jackson (died in 1915) who was a 2nd Class passenger from Buffalo, New York who was aboard the RMS Lusitania at the time of the sinking, and perished in the accident

Mr. Isaac Jackson, who was a 2nd Class passenger from Patterson, New Jersey, who sailed aboard the RMS Lusitania at the time of the sinking, and survived the accident

William Jackson (1759-1828) who was a politician from America, and served as the Secretary to the United States Constitutional Convention

Major-General Stonewall Jackson (1894-1987) who was a Commanding General in the 84th Division in the year 1943, from America

Jackson Family Gift Ideas

Browse Jackson family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Bromfield, co. Middlesex; John Jackson, gent., son of Joseph Jackson, merchant. Visit. Middlesex, 1663). Gu. a greyhound courant ar. betw. three pheons or. Crest—A demi greyhound saliant ar. collared or, holding betw. the paws a pheon sa.
2) (Beach Hill, co. Surrey, bart., extinct). Motto—Malo mori quam foedari. Gu. a fesse betw. three shovellers, tufted on the head and breast ar. each charged with a trefoil slipped vert. Crest—A shoveller, as in the arms, motto over, Innocentiæ securus.
3) (The Manor House, Birkenhead, and Portland Place, London, bart.). Motto—Fortiter, fideliter, feliciter. Az. a fesse betw. two goats’ heads couped in chief and a fleur-de-lis in base ar. two flaunches of the last. Crest—Upon a ragged staff sa. a goat’s head couped ar. semée of trefoils vert.
4) (Doncaster, co. York). Motto—Strenue et honeste. Per pale gu. and az. on a fess erm. cotised ar. betw. three shovellers of the last a cross crosslet betw. two annulets of the field. Crest—A demi griffin gu. collared and chain reflected over the back or, holding in the dexter claw a shoveller's head erased ar.
5) (arms of Anne, wife of Hawkshaw, eldest surviving dau. of Rev. James Jackson, late of Green Hammerton par Whixley, W.R. co. York). Gu. two horses counter courant in pale ar. guttée de sang.
6) (Arlsey, co. Bedford, bart.). Ar. on a fessa betw. a goat’s head couped in chief gu. and a ship in full sail in base ppr. a greyhound courant betw. two pheons or. Crest—A goat's head couped ar. guttée de sang, armed and bearded or, gorged with a collar gu. charged with three bezants, ringed and line reflexed over the back gold.
7) (co. Cumberland, and Combhay, co. Devon). Or, (another, ar.) on a chev. sa. betw. tlnee eagles’ heads erased az. as many cinquefoils ar. Crest—A horse courant ar. guttée de sang.
8) (Keswick, co. Cumberland, and co. Oxford). Erm. a spear’s head in pale az. embrued gu. Crest—A sun or, in flames ppr.
9) Ar. on a fess gu. betw. three hawks’ heads erased sa. a greyhound courant ar. betw. two. pheons or, a bordure sa. bezanty.
10) (Gaurhorpe, co. York, 1584). Sa. a cross patonce or, a bordure of the last. Crest—A bear’s head erm. muzzled and collared gu. the collar ringed or.
11) (London; Francis Jackson, citizen of London, Visit. 1568, great grandson of John Jackson, the second son of William Jackson, Esq., of Sugthall, co. York). Gu. a fess ar. betw. three jackdaws ppr.
12) (Chester Herald, temp. Henry VIII.). Vert on a fesse or, three magpies ppr.
13) (West Chester). Ar. on a fesse gu. a greyhound courant betw. two pheons or, in chief a goat's head couped of the second, a bordure of the last. Crest—A goat's head az. attired or.
14) (cos. Derby and Stafford). Ar. a lion pass. gu. on a chief of the second three battle axes of the first.
15) (co. Hereford). Motto—Scuto amoris divini. Ar. on a chev. sa. betw. three hawks’ heads erased az. as many cinquefoils or. Crest—On a five-leaved coronet or, a hawk's head and neck erased gu. charged on the breast with a cross pattée fitchée gold.
16) (Claines, co. Worcester; Phineas Jackson, High Sheriff of the county, 3 Queen Anne, 1703). Ar. on a fess gu. betw. three cocks' heads erased sa. a greyhound courant betw. two pheons of the field, a border engr. az. bezantée.
17) (Ward-Jackson, Greatham Hall, co. Durham). Az. a fesse erm. betw. three sheldrakes ppr. Crest—A sheldrake ppr.
18) (Sunderland, co. Durham). Ar. on a cher. sa. betw. three hawks’ heads erased of the second as many cinquefoils pierced of the first. Crest—A horse at full speed ar. guttée de sang.
19) (co. Kent). Or, on a fesse betw. three pheons az. a lion pass. of the first. Crest—A demi lion ramp, or, holding betw. the paws a pheon az.
20) (Southgate, co. Middlesex). Gu. a greyhound courant in fesse ar. betw. three pheons or. Crest—A greyhound pass. sa. collared or, resting the dexter foot on a pheon gold.
21) (London). Same Arms. Crest—A hand ppr. holding a boar’s head erased and erect sa.
22) (Newcastle-on-Tyne, co. Northumberland). Gu. a fesse betw. three shovellers ar.
23) (co. Northampton; granted 1689). Ar. a greyhound courant ermines betw. three eagles’ heads erased sa. Crest—A demi horse ar. guttée de sang.
24) (co. Nottingham; Right Rev. John Jackson, D.D., Bishop of Lincoln, 1853). Sa. a cross pattée betw. three pheons or.
25) (co. Oxford, 1790). Sa. a spearhead ar. a canton or, a label for diff. Crest—An eagle rising ppr.
26) (co. Rutland). Ar. guttée de sang a spearhead in pale az. embrued gu. Crest—A sun rising ppr.
27) (Lochhouse, Scotland). Barry of eight or and gu. a lion ramp. ar.
28) (Scotland). Barry of ten ar. and az. over all a lion ramp. gu.
29) (Hickleton, co. York, bart., extinct 1727; descended from Sir John Jackson, Knt., temp. Queen Elizabeth, whose grandson, John Jackson, Esq., of Hickleton, was created a baronet in 1660). Gu. a fesse betw. three sheldrakes ar.
30) (Harraton, co. Durham; Sir John Jackson, Knt., Lieutentant-Colonel in the service of Charles I., eldest son of Тhomas Jackson, Esq., of Harraton, d. 1673). Or, a chev. indented gu. betw. three eagles' heads erased sa.
31) (Bath, со. Somerset). Gu. a greyhound courant in fesse ar. collared az. betw. three pheons or, on the shoulder a torteau. Crest—A dove close, in the beak an olive branch ppr. on the breast a torteau.
32) (Christ Church, co. Surrey; granted 16 Oct. 1700). Az. on a chev. betw. three covered cups ar. as many cinquefoils gu. Crest—A horse pass. ar. semee of cinquefoils
33) (Bedale, со. York; granted 1563). Ar. on a chev. sa. betw. three hawks’ heads erased of the second as many cinquefoils of the first. Crest—A horse in full speed ar. guttée de sang.
34) (Kelwoold’s Grove, co. York). Gu. three suns or, a chief erm. Crest—The sun or, betw. two branches in orle vert. Another Crest—A naked arm embowed, grasping a poniard all ppr.
35) (co. York). Ar. on a chev. sa. betw. three eagles’ heads erased az. as many cinquefoils of the field, on a chief or, two anchors in cross of the third betw. as many trefoils slipped of the last, each charged with twelve bezants.
36) (Normandy Hall, co. York). Az. a fesse erm. betw. three sheldrakes ppr. Crest—A sheldrake ppr.
37) (co. York). Gu. a fesse betw. three falcons close ar.
38) (Duddington, co. Northampton). Ar. a greyhound courant ermines betw. three eagles’ heads erased sa. Crest—A demi horse ar. guttée de sang, maned and hoofed sa.
39) (Bubnell, co. Derby; three generations described in the Visitation of 1662). Ar. a lion pass. gu. on a chief of the last three battle axes of the first. Crest—An arm in armour embowed, holding a battle axe all ppr.
40) Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. a lion pass. gu. on a chief of the last three battle axes of the first; 2nd and 3rd, or, three bars wavy az. on a canton gu. a lion pass, guard, or. Crest—An arm in armour embowed, holding a battle axe all ppr.
41) Sa. a pheon, point down ar. a canton or. Crest—An eagle close ppr.
42) Ar. on a chev. betw. three daws’ heads erased az. as many cinquefoils or. Crest—A horse courant ar. guttée de sang.
43) Ar. on a fesse betw. three cocks’ heads erased sa a greyhound betw. two pheons or, a bordure az. platée.
44) Az. a lion ramp. ar. billettée gu.
45) Ar. a chev. gu. betw. three Cornish choughs ppr.
46) Vert a fesse or, betw. three magpies ppr.
47) (Richard Jackson, Esq., of Preston, co. Lancaster; the representative of a family originally of co. Chester). Motto—Malo mori quam foedari. Ar. on a chev. sa. betw. as many falcons’ heads erased az. three cinquefoils pierced of the field. Crest—A falcon's head.
48) Ar. a lion pass. betw. three martlets or.
49) (Coleraine, co. Londonderry; Fun. Ent. 1688, William Jackson, son of Rev. Richard Jackson, of Whittington, co. Lancaster, by Dorothy Otway, his wife, dau. of Sir John Otway, Knt., of Ingmire). Gu. a fess betw. three cormorants ar.
50) (Enniscoe, co. Mayo; confirmed to General Sir James Jackson, K.C.B., Colonel 6th Dragoon Guards, third son of George Jackson, M.P., and to the descendants of his grandfather). Motto—Celer et audax. Ar. on a chev. sa. betw. three hawks' heads erased az. as many trefoils slipped or. Crest—A horse pass. ar. charged on the shoulder with a trefoil slipped vert.
51) (Fanningstown, co. Limerick). Ar. a greyhound courant ermines betw. three eagles' heads erased sa. Crext— A demi horse ramp. ar. guttée de sang, maned and hoofed sa.
52) (Ahanesk, co. Cork). Ar. a lion pass. gu. on a chief of the last three battle axes of the first. Crest—An arm in armour embowed, in the hand a battle axe all ppr.
53) (Glanbeg, co. Waterford). Same Arms. Crest—An arm in armour embowed holding a battle axe all ppr.
54) (Forkhill, co. Armagh). Motto—Malo mori quam fœdari. Gu. three shovellers tufted on the head and breast ar. each charged with a trefoil vert. Crest—A shoveller, as in the arms.
55) (Torphin, Scotland). Motto—Devant si je puis. Gu. three suns in splendour or, a bordure ar. a chief erm. Crest—A dexter arm in armour embowed, holding a battle axe ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pheon
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P204
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P69
16. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
17. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cinquefoil