Lathbury Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Lathbury Family Coat of Arms

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Lathbury Coat of Arms Meaning

Lathbury Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Lathebury.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Lathbury. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Lathbury Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Lathbury blazon are the crescent, paly, canton and marlet. The three main tinctures (colors) are argent, or and azure .

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

Play is what is known as a treatment, a regular patterning, usually over the whole background of the shield. The word comes from the pale, the major vertical stripe that appears on some shields, paly is obvious its little cousin, consisting of, typically, 6 or more vertical stripes, alternately coloured 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Paly. The stripes can be any combination of the heraldic tinctures, an early example is that of GURNEY, being simply paly of six, or and argent. Paly can be combined with other effects, such as decorative edges on each stripe, or overlaid with other treatments such as bendy, and these can be very effective and pleasing to the eye 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P121.

“The canton stands very high among honourable bearings”, according to Wade, a noted symbologist 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P48. The canton is a square shape, normally occupying the dexter chief of the shield. An early example is SUTTON, Bishop of Lincoln in the 13th century, who bore “argent a canton sable”. It occupies less space than a quarter and hence is sometimes added to an existing shield to difference branches of the same family, or, when a charge is added to it, to indicate some honour has been recieved 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Canton. Wade remarks, that, in common with all square features can be associated with the virtue of“constancy”.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Lathbury Name

Lathbury Origin:

England

Origins of Lathbury:

This new surname is an example of an English locational name acquiring from the church of Lathbury in Buckinghamshire near Newport Pagnell. The placename was first noted in the Domesday Book of 1086 as ‘Latesberie’ and by 1163 as ‘Lateberi.’ The origin is from the Old English pre 7th Century ‘laett’ which means ‘lath’, a thin narrow band of wood, and ‘burg’ which usually meant a hidden place, particularly one which had been Roman, and could also mean a hidden estate house or house, here the name means a ‘burg’ (a fort), built of laths. Locational names were especially used by those people who departed from their original homes and went to live or work in another town or hamlet. In June 1540, Joan Lathbury an infant, named in St. Margaret’s, Westminster, London and in May 1581, the wedding of John Lathbury and Luce Collinwood took place in St. James, Clerkenwell, London.

Variations:

More common variations are: Leathbury, Lathbury, Lathabury, Luthbury, Lathbary, Lethbury, Lathberry, Leathberry, Laithbar, Lathibar.

England:

The surname Lathbury first appeared in Buckinghamshire at Lathbury, a hamlet and local church in the District of Milton Keynes, in the union of Newport-Pagnell, hundred of Newport. This church which is almost enclosed by the river Ouse contains about 1,200 acres. The place recorded back to the Domesday Book where it noted as Lateberie and meant “fortification built with strips or beams” having acquired from the Old English words laett and burh. There is a grand estate house which records back to at least 1272. After, some of the family appeared at Egginton in Derbyshire. “The manor [of Egginton] afterward waistcoat in the family of Lathbury, of whom a coheiress produced a family to the Leighs; and on the death of Sir Henry Leigh in the period of James I., the estate transferred to his daughter Anne.”

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Domina de Lathbiry, dated about 1273, in the “Hundred Rolls of Buckingham,” It was during the time of King Edward 1st, who was known to be the “The Hammer of the Scots,” dated 1272-1307. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Lathbury had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Lathbury landed in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 17th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Lathbury who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Richard Lathbury, who came to Virginia in 1653. John Lathbury landed in Virginia in the year 1655. John Lathbury to Virginia in the year 1655. Daniel Lathbury to America in the year 1680.

The following century saw more Lathbury surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Lathbury who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included James Lathbury to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the year 1833.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Lathbury: United States 234; England 220; Australia 41; Monaco 1; Isle of Man 1; Germany 1; Canada 1; New Zealand 1; Wales 1.

Notable People:

Thomas Lathbury (1798 – 1865) was an English cleric known as an ecclesiastical biographer.

Lathbury Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (co. Derby). Paly of six ar. and az. on a canton or, a crescent sa.
2) (cos. Lancaster and Leicester). Barry of six ar. and az. on a canton of the second a martlet or.
3) (Holme, co. Derby. Visit. 1611). Ar. two bars and a canton az. charged with a martlet or (another, ar.).
4) Ar. three bars az. on a canton of the second a martlet or.

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References   [ + ]

1. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Paly
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P121
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P48
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Canton