Maltby Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Maltby Family Coat of Arms

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Maltby Coat of Arms Meaning

Maltby Name Origin & History

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Maltby Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Maltby blazon are the garb, bend, lion and cross pattee. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, gules and or .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Europe in the middle ages was still a largely agrarian society, and the wealth of the nobility resided in their estates and land. Since most people still lived and worked on the land they would find farm implements instantly recognisable, (an important feature for a coat of arms), even if they seem obscure to us today. 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 86 The garb for example is an ancient word for wheatsheaf, something now more frequently seen in Inn signs than in the field! 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Garbe

The bend is a distinctive part of the shield, frequently occuring and clearly visible from a distance – it is a broad band running from top left to bottom right 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40. Indeed, so important is the bend that it was the subject of one of the earliest cases before the English Court of Chivalry; the famous case of 1390, Scrope vs Grosvenor had to decide which family were the rightful owners of Azure, a bend or (A blue shield, with yellow bend). 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22. The bend is held in high honour and may signify “defence or protection” and often borne by those of high military rank 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 15Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 16Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 17A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 18The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Maltby Name

Maltby Origin:

England

Origins of Maltby:

According to the early recordings of the spelling of the surname, this interesting and unique name is listed as Maltby, Malteby, Maultby and originally Maltebi, this is an English surname. It is of geographical origin from any of the places called Maltby in Lincolnshire and in the North and West Ridings of Yorkshire. The place name from Lincolnshire first shows as Maltebi in the popular Domesday Book of 1086, and acquires from pre 7th century Danish-Viking particular name Malti which means sharp or strong, with the Norse addition of “byr,” which means a farmland or settlement. Geographical surnames are originally “from” names. That is to say that they were surnames of easy recognitation, given to people after they departed from their original hamlets or even towns and cities, to move to any other place. Early examples of documentations contain Andrew de Malteby, in the Assize Court rolls of Yorkshire in 1219, and William de Maultby in the Hundred Rolls of landowners of Lincolnshire in 1273. A next example acquired from the remaining parish records of the city of London is that of William Maltby and Mary Westley married at St. Mary Aldermary in 1704. Edward Maltby (1770 – 1859) was the priest of Durham 1836 – 1856.

Variations:

More common variations are: Maultby, Maltbey, Maltiby, Maultbay, Maltabey, Maultiby, Maultoby, Multby, Moltby, Maltba.

England:

The surname Maltby first appeared in Yorkshire at Maltby (Maultby) an old mining town and local church in South Yorkshire or at Maltby a hamlet and local church in North Yorkshire. Maltby is also a village in the East Lindsey county of Lincolnshire. The Yorkshire locals are by far the larger of the place names.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Robert de Maltebi , dated about 1169, in the “Pipe Rolls of Norfolk”. It was during the time of King Henry II who was known to be the “Builder of Churches”, dated 1154 – 1189. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Maltby had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Maltby landed in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 17th and 19th. Some of the people with the name Maltby who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included John Maltby settled in Salem, Massachusetts in 1630 along with Robert and William.

The following century saw much more Maltby surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Maltby who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included William Maltby at the age of 49, arrived in New York in 1812. Samuel Maltby settled in Fairfield, Conn. in 1820. Albert Maltby, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) Division, Pennsylvania in 1871.

Australia:

Some of the indiduals with the surname Maltby who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Sarah Maltby at the age of 17, a servant, arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Sultana” in 1850.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Maltby: England 2,764; United States 2,246; Canada 753; Australia 600; South Africa 256; Scotland 79; New Zealand 78; Denmark 54; Northern Ireland 48; Spain 24.

Notable People:

Christopher Maltby was the British Major-General in command of Hong Kong who guarded against the Japanese attack on the colony in December 1941.

H.F. Maltby, prolific UK (originally from South Africa) was an actor and author.

Jasper A. Maltby was an American Civil War general.

John Maltby was a British artist and ceramics maker, born 1936.

Kirk Maltby was an active NHL ice hockey player.

Margaret Eliza Maltby was an American physicist.

Richard Maltby is an American band manager.

Richard Maltby is a Tony Award-winning Broadway (New York City) theater manager and composer.

Sir Thomas Maltby was an Australian leader and Speaker of the Victorian Legislative Assembly.

Maltby Family Gift Ideas

Browse Maltby family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Maltby, Cleveland, co. York). Ar. on a bend gu. three garbs or. Crest—A garb or, banded gu.
2) (Edward Maltby, Bishop of Chichester, 1831, and of Durham, 1836-56). Ar. on a bend gu. betw. a lion ramp. and a cross pattée of the second three garbs or.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 86
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Garbe
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
15. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
16. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
17. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
18. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60