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Nightingale Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

/Nightingale Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Nightingale Family Coat of Arms

Variations of this name are: Nightingall.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Nightingale. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Nightingale Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Nightingale blazon are the rose and ibex. The two main tinctures (colors) are gules and ermine.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The rose is also of this type, being drawn, at least a little, realistically and often to very pleasing effect. It has long been present in English heraldry, and as a badge and symbol played an enormous in English history throughout the conflict between rival dynasties known as the War of the Roses. In addition to these familial uses, Wade suggests that red roses signify “beauty and grace” and the white represents “love and faith”. 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P132-133

The ibex or antelope was drawn by heraldic artists in rather more fearsome aspect than its real-life appearance, with large horns, mane and a long tail. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Antelope These days we regard the ibex as being a member of the goat family rather than an antelope, but in the middle ages there were was no real distinction between these animals. They could adopt many of the poses of the lion, such as rampant and statant. 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P210

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Nightingale Name

Nightingale Origin:

England

Origin of Nightingale:

It is unique and interesting surname which comes from Anglo-Saxon in origin and is a nickname for an individual with a great, sweet singing voice, more precisely from the bird, the nightingale. The foundation of this surname associated with the Olde English pre 7th Century word “nihtegal,” itself derived from the word “niht” which means ‘night,’ plus “galan” which means “to whistle or sing” and in Middle English the word “nichti(n)gale.” The names of birds were frequently used as a nickname in old England, from some authentic or assumed similarity to a bird. Further examples are Finch, Hawk, Jay, and Lark. The surname evolution since 1176 has consisted of Richard Nihtingale (1227, Bedfordshire), Alan Nightegale (1260, Cambridgeshire) and Henry Nitingale (1287, London). In the new era, the surname can be organized and listed as Nightingale, Nightingall, and Nightingirl. Possibly, the most famous bearer of the name was Florence Nightingale (1820 – 1910), who was an English nurse, recognized as the Lady of the Lamp, famous for her work during the Crimean War. She helped to boost the rank of the nursing occupation and in 1860 a training school established for nurses in London.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Knightingale, Nightinggale, Nightinagale, Nightingayle, Nightingal, Nightingle, Nightngale, Nightengale, Nightingall, Nightinggle.

England:

The name Nightingale was first found in Norfolk where they held a family seat from ancient times and given an estate by Duke William of Normandy, their true King, for their important services at the campaign of Hastings in 1066 A.D.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Walter Nichtegale, which was dated 1176, in the “Pipe Rolls of Gloucestershire.” It was during the time of King Henry II who was known to be “The Builder of Churches,” 1154 – 1189.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Nightingale settled in the United States in four different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, 19th and 20th. Some of the people with the name Nightingale who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Thomas Nightingale, who come to Virginia in 1648. Tho Nightingale, who landed in Virginia in 1648. Kath Nightingale, who arrived in Virginia in 1649. William Nightingale, who came to Massachusetts in 1690.

Some of the people with the name Nightingale who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Mathew Nightingale settled in Virginia in 1764. Henry Nightingale came to Charleston in 1792.

Some of the people with the name Nightingale who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Thomas Nightingale, who came to Philadelphia in 1802. A.F. Nightingale at the age of 52, who emigrated to the United States, in 1896.

Some of the people with the name Nightingale who settled in the United States in the 20th century included Alma Sabina Nightingale at the age of 7, who settled in America from Allett Yorks, England in 1906. Arthur P Nightingale at the age of 26, who settled in America from Dorset, in 1906. Alice Nightingale at the age of 28, who emigrated to America from Bury, England, in 1907. Alice Nightingale, at the age of 21, who landed in America from London, England, in 1908. Arthur P. Nightingale, at the age of 29, who emigrated to the United States from Salisbury, England, in 1908.

New Zealand:

Some of the people with the name Nightingale who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included William Nightingale arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Nimroud” in 1860.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Nightingale: United States 5,167; England 7,738; Australia 1,708; Canada 1,245; Wales 327; Kenya 314; Scotland 269; South Africa 1,589; Germany 235; New Zealand 566.

Notable People:

Nightingale Baronets was a famous personality in the Baronetage of England.

Albert Nightingale (1923–2006), was an English football player.

Andrea Nightingale was an American professor.

Annie Nightingale (born 1942), is a British radio announcer.

Anthony Nightingale (born 1947), is a Hong Kong businessman.

Benedict Nightingale (born 1939), is a British scholar.

Danny Nightingale (born 1954), is a British modern pent athlete.

Danny Nightingale (soldier) (born 1975), is a British fighter.

David Nightingale was an English football player.

Earl Nightingale (1921–1989), was an American leader.

Florence Nightingale (1820–1910), was a British pioneer of modern nursing.

Nightingale Family Gift Ideas

Browse Nightingale family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Kneesworth Hall, co. Cambridge, bart.). (Newportpond, co. Essex). Per pale erm. and gu. a rose counterchanged. Crest—An ibex sejant ar. tufted, armed, and maned or.
2) (Neale, co. Essex). Per pale sa. and gu. a rose counterchanged, barbed vert, seeded or.
3) (Lichfield, London, and co. Warwick; granted 1593). Erm. a rose gu. seeded or, barbed vert, a crescent for diff. Crest—A greyhound courant erm. charged with a crescent for diff.
4) (Ballygran, co. Wexford; Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Office, 1632, of Isabel, wife of Luke Nightingale, Esq.. of Ballygran). Per pale ar. and gu. three roses counterchanged, leaved vert, seeded or.
5) (Brome Hall, co. Norfolk). Erm. a rose gu. on a chief embattled or, two banners in saltire, the staves enfiled by a wreath of laurel ppr. a canton gu. charged with the representation of a medal. Crest—On a mural crown or, an ibex ar. horned, maned, and tufted or, gorged with a wreath of laurel vert.
6) Erm. a rose gu. Crest—An ibex ppr.

One Comment

  1. Lynette Kay Maciver nee Nightingale October 29, 2016 at 8:12 pm - Reply

    What can you tell me about the Nightingales who are in Australia. My Father,Wallace. Nightingale was one of 13 children. He was born in Mount Morgan, a gold mining town in Queensland. He eas born around 1905.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P132-133
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Antelope
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P210
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
12. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
16. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
17. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
18. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P132-133
19. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Antelope
20. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P210