Peat Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Peat Family Coat of Arms

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Peat Coat of Arms Meaning

Peat Name Origin & History

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Peat Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Peat blazon are the escallop, mascle and gyronny. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, or and gules .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.7The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 9Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

The escallopoccurs often in arms, represented as the outside of the shell, sometimes “fluted” of a different colour 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop. It has been part of heraldic tradition almost from the beginning of the art, Henry III of England awarded Gules, 3 escallopes argent to Herbert de CHAMBERLEYNE in the 13th century, and it is present in the heraldry of almost all countries 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299. It is believed that they were adopted as badges of those going to the Holy Land and can be found in the arms of many a crusading family. Hence Wade’s suggested association of the scallop with those that “complete long journeys to far countries” 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91.

The mascle is a close relative of the lozenge or diamond shape, but with the centre cut away revealing the background underneath. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Mascle. Guillim, writing in the 17th century reckoned the mascle to represent the mesh of a net, being the biblical symbol for “persuasion, whereby men are induced to virtue and verity”. 14A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P234

Gyronny is a very distinctive pattern covering the whole field of the shield, being a series of triangles, drawn from the edges and meeting in the centre of the shield 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Gyronny. Each triangle is known as a gyron, and these sometimes appear as charges in their own right 16Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 55. Wade suggests that the use of gyrons upon a shield should be taken to denote “unity”.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Peat Name

Peat Origin:

England

Origins of Peat:

This name has three possible sources. The first being an English diminutive form of the particular name Peter, from the Greek “petros” which means a “rock.” The name may also have started as a nickname for a gentle person. “Peat” being an older form of “Pet” as the following quotes shows as “A pretty peat” – The Taming of the Shrew, and, “As sick as a peate” – Notes and Queries (1857). Finally, it may be of geographical origin i.e. “at the peat.” One Richard de Peyt listed in Somerset in 1327. However, we think this to be the most reliable source. In the new era, the name spelled like Peat, Peatt, and Peet(t). One Thomas Peat (1708-1780), was an almanac-maker and wrote the “Gentleman’s Diary.”

Variations:

More common variations are: Peate, Peaty, Peatt, Peato, Pyeat, Peata, Peati, Peuat, Peait, Peatu

England:

The surname Peat first appeared in Kent where they held a family seat from old times, and their first recordings showed on the early poll rolls derived by the early Kings of Britain to decide the rate of taxation of their activities.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of John Peat, dated about 1635, in the “A Husbandman of Derbieshier.” It was during the time of King Charles I who was known to be the “The Martyr,” dated 1625 – 1649. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with name Pete had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Peat landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Peat who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Jo Peat arrived in New England in 1635. Joe and John Peat, both settled in Boston in 1635. John Peat, who landed in Virginia in 1649.

People with the surname Peat who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Joshua Peat, who arrived in Jamaica in 1746. Richard Peat settled in Virginia in 1754.

The following century saw more Peat surnames arrive. Some of the people with the name Peat who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Robert Peat, who landed in New York in 1824. George Peat came to Philadelphia in 1878.

Canada:

People with the surname Peat settled in Canada in the 18th century. Some of the people with the surname Peat who came to Canada in the 18th century included Mr. Epenetus Peat U.E. who settled in New Brunswick near the year 1784.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Peat who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Emily Peat and Louisa Peat, both arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Harpley” in the same year 1848. Ann Peat arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Lady Flora” in 1851.

New-Zealand:

Some of the population with the surname Peat who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included George Peat, Elizabeth Peat, Elizabeth Peat, Mary Peat and John Peat, all arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Helenslee” in the same year 1864.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Peat: England 2,705; United States 1,205; Australia 563; Canada 526; Scotland 446; New Zealand 386; Taiwan 232; Jamaica 178; Germany 168; France 135

Notable People:

Andrus Peat (born 1993), is an American football player.

Charles Urie Peat (February 1892–October 1979), was a British leader and cricket player.

F. David Peat (born April 1938), is a British scientist and writer.

Harold R. Peat (July 1893–1960), was a Canadian officer and writer.

Jeremy Peat (born March 1945), is a British professor.

Louisa Watson Small Peat (1883–1952), was an Irish speaker and writer.

Peat Family Gift Ideas

Browse Peat family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Sevenoaks, co. Kent). Motto—Ardens. Ar. on a bend engr. gu. betw. two escallops az. three mascles or. Crest—On a mount of bulrushes ppr. a stork ar. beaked and legged gu. in front of mount two mascles interlaced fesseways az.
2) (England). Gyronny of twelve sa. and or. Crest—A hand holding a fish ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
9. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Mascle
14. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P234
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Gyronny
16. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 55