Perryman Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Perryman Family Coat of Arms

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Perryman Coat of Arms Meaning

Perryman Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Perriman.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Perryman. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Perryman Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Perryman blazon are the leopard’s face, pile and chevron engrailed. The two main tinctures (colors) are vert and or.

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The leopard’s face (sometimes, incorrectly referred to as a leopard’s head occurs very frequently in heraldry 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion. Early heraldic artists tended to treat lions and leopards as the same animal, but during the development of British Heraldry the heads of the two creatures have adopted separate, and more realistic forms. Wade would have us associate leopards with warriors, especially those who overcome ”hazardous things by force and courage” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P65

The pile was originally quite a simple shape, being a triangle reaching from the top of the shield down to a point near the lower centre 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pile. A clear example being that of CHANDOS awarded in 1337, Or a pile gules. There is some argument as to the origin, Wade suggests some similarity with the meaning of “pile” in construction (a foundation) and hence that the shape could be adopted by those who have demonstrated some ability in the building trade 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P48. An earlier writer, Guillim, perhaps more plausibly suggested that the shape echoes those of a pennant or triangular flag 11A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P52 The shape is quite distinctive however and became popular, leading to many embellishments to distinguish it from its close fellows, with multiple piles meeting at various points, starting from various edges and with additional decoration, leading to potentially quite complex descriptions!

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries, being in the form of an inverted ‘v’ shape 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chevron. It is a popular feature, visually very striking and hence developed to have various decorative edges applied to distinguish otherwise identical coats of arms. The edge pattern engrailed is a series of scalloped indentations with the points facing outwards – and should not be confused with invected, which has the points facing inwards! Wade believes that both of these indented forms represent “earth or land”, and one perhaps can indeed see the furrowed earth embodied in them.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Perryman Name

Perryman Origin:

England

Origins of Perryman:

The surname of Perryman can be traced to the country of England, and is regarded as an occupational surname, and possibly a topographical surname. This means that the original bearer of the surname of Perryman most likely worked as someone who sold or grew pears, meaning that he actually carried out this job. Occupational surnames were not originally hereditary surnames. They only became hereditary if the son followed in his father’s footsteps for a career; then the surname became hereditary and was used by the children and spouse of the son. In the case of the surname of Perryman, it comes from the Old English Pre 6th Century word of “pyrige,” which can be translated to mean “pear tree,” and the addition of the suffix of “man,” which can be translated to mean “one who worked.” Thus, someone who bore the surname of Perryman was likely to be someone who grew or sold pears. Another possible origin of the surname of Perryman is that it is a topographical surname for someone who lived near a pear tree grove, or a place where pears grew. A topographical surname is used to describe someone who lived on or near a residential landmark. This landmark could be either man made or natural, and would have been easily identifiable in the area from which it hailed, thus making the people who lived near it easily distinguished.

Variations:

More common variations are: Perrymann, Pearryman, Paerryman, Perreyman, Perry Man, Peryman, Perrman, Perrymanni, Perriman, Parryman, Perreman, Perrymon, Peeryman, Purryman, Piriman, Paraman

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Perryman can be traced to the country of England. One person by the name of Richard Piriman was mentioned in the document known as the Hundred Rolls of Essex in the year of 1273. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King Edward I of England, who was known throughout the ages and commonly referred to as one “Edward Longshanks,” or one “The Hammer of the Scots,” and was thus named for the trials, tribulations, and hardships that he enacted on the people of Scotland throughout his reign. King Edward I of England ruled from the year of 1272 to the year of 1307. Another mention of the surname of Perryman in the country of England was one William Perryman, who was mentioned in the document known as the Hundred Rolls of Cumberland in the year of 1279, while one Adam Purryman was mentioned in the document known as the Tax Rolls of Somerset in the year of 1327.

United States of America:

It became common for many European citizens to migrate to the United States of America in both the 17th and 18th Centuries. This large movement of people, which was then known as the European Migration, and sometimes referred to as the Great Migration occurred because these citizens were unhappy with the state of their government. The United States, which was then known as the New World or the Colonies promised freedoms that these citizens have never been afforded. Among those who migrated to the United States of America was one person by the name of William Perryman, who settled in the state of New York in the year of 1847.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Perryman: United States 10,537; England 2,043; Australia 969; South Africa 365; Canada 320; Wales 214; Trinidad and Tobago 142; Barbados 70; Scotland 59; France 49; Ireland 44; Child 36; Netherlands 31; Grenada 26; United Arab Emirates 23

Notable People:

Emmett Key Perryman (1888-1966) who was a professional baseball player from the United States of America

Louis Byron Perryman (1941-2009) who was a character actor from the United States of America

Robert Louis Perryman (born in 1964) who is a former professional football running back from the United States of America

Mike Van Perryman, who served as an Alternate Delegate to the Democratic National Convention from the state of Illinois in the year of 1924, and who was a Democratic politician from the United States of America

Stephen Peter Perryman (born in 1955) who was a cricketer from the country of England

Stephen John “Steve” Perryman (born in 1951) who was a football player and manager from the country of England, and who was awarded the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire or MBE

Jill Perryman (born in 1933) who was a stage actress and a singer from the United States of America

Perryman Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (London; granted 25 March, 1710). (London; granted 25 March, 1710). Or, on a pile vert a chev. engr. betw. three leopards’ faces of the field. Crest—Two arms issuing out of clouds ppr. habited vert, cuffed ar. holding a leopard’s face or.
2) Same Arms. Crest—A wolf pass. sa.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P65
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pile
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P48
11. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P52
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chevron