Peter Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Peter Family Coat of Arms

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Peter Coat of Arms Meaning

Peter Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Peters, Petre.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Peter. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Peter Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Peter blazon are the escallop, leopard’s face, key and cornish chough. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, or and gules .

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.6The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

The escallopoccurs often in arms, represented as the outside of the shell, sometimes “fluted” of a different colour 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop. It has been part of heraldic tradition almost from the beginning of the art, Henry III of England awarded Gules, 3 escallopes argent to Herbert de CHAMBERLEYNE in the 13th century, and it is present in the heraldry of almost all countries 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299. It is believed that they were adopted as badges of those going to the Holy Land and can be found in the arms of many a crusading family. Hence Wade’s suggested association of the scallop with those that “complete long journeys to far countries” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91.

The leopard’s face (sometimes, incorrectly referred to as a leopard’s head occurs very frequently in heraldry 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion. Early heraldic artists tended to treat lions and leopards as the same animal, but during the development of British Heraldry the heads of the two creatures have adopted separate, and more realistic forms. Wade would have us associate leopards with warriors, especially those who overcome ”hazardous things by force and courage” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P65

Although we expect to find fierce creatures and fearsome weapons depicted in a coat of arms this is not always the case – sometimes simple household objects are used 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281. The key is a typical example of this. Sometimes these objects were chosen for the familiarity they would have for the obsever, helping them identify the owner, and sometimes they were used because of some association with the owner, or a similarity to the family name. 15Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 100 In other cases, Wade suggests that their appearance can be taken to indicate “guardianship and dominion”. 116The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P47

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Peter Name

Peter Origin:

Greece

Origins of Peter:

The surname of Peter is arguably one of the most prominent surnames in the world, especially among those who follow Christianity. It is said that in the Bible, it is written that Jesus Christ chose Peter to be “the rock of the church,” on which it was to be founded. Following the crusades of the early medieval period, this name gained popularity throughout Europe. The name of Peter itself derives from the personal given name of Peter, and is thus popular among the Christian population. St. Peter was one of the favorite saints of the medieval Catholic church, and thus was popular throughout the country of England. The name of Peter can be translated to mean “rock,” or someone who is “steadfast,” which is derived from the Greek word of “petros,” which can be translated to mean “rock,” or “stone.” The surname of Peter was also used as a nickname. It is a common element of surnames throughout Europe that many of them originally derived from nicknames, as it was a very common practice in medieval times. In the beginning, nicknames were applied to people who had distinguishing characteristics, such as moral or mental peculiarities, a similar appearance to a bird or animal, a similar disposition to a bird or animal, occupation of an individual, their habits, or their manner of dress. In the case of the surname of Peter, those who bore this surname were often said to be “strong-willed,” or “steadfast.”

Variations:

More common variations are: Peters, Peterson, Peterken, Pears, Pearse, Perkin, Perkins, Perkinson, Pyrke, Parkin, Parkyn, Parkins, Parkyns, Parkinson

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Peter can be traced to the country of England. One person by the name of one Ralph Peter was mentioned in the document knowns as the Pipe Rolls of the county of Hertford, in the year of 1195. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King Richard I of England, who was known throughout the ages and commonly referred to as one “The Lionheart.” King Richard I of England ruled from the year of 1189 to the year of 1199. Other mentions of the surname of Peter include one Luke Petre, who was recorded as living in London, England in the year of 1282, and one William Petres who was recorded as living in Somerset, England in the year of 1327.

Spain:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Peter within the country of Spain was one person by the name of Andres Guillen Perez, who was recorded as residing within the area of Aguaron, Zaragoza, Spain in the year of 1565.

Mexico:

Within the country of Mexico, there is a sizable population of those who bear the surname of Peter. One person by the name of Martina Josepha Perez was recorded as residing in the area of Santa Catarina, Mexico in the year of 1775, and is the first recorded person to bear this surname in the country. Another mention of the surname of Peter within the country of Mexico includes one Diego Peres, who married one Maria Ysabel Yorba in Mexico City, Mexico, before migrating to the United States of America, and settling in Santa Catarina, Los Angeles in the year of 1775.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Peter: Nigeria 235,519; Tanzania 178,779; Uganda 48,357; Kenya 29,269; Papua New Guinea 22,914; India 20,021; Sudan 17,526; Hungary 14,920; South Africa 14,629; United States 14,140; Malaysia 10,776

Notable People:

Victor St. Peter, who was an American Democrat politician, and who served as the Delegate to Democratic National Convention from Maine in the year of 1964.

 

George St. Peter, who was an American Republican politician, and was elected to the Missouri State House of Representatives from Mercer County in the year of 1964.

 

Francis X. St. Peter, who was an American Republican politician, who served as the Presidential Elector for Michigan in the year of 1920.

 

Werner Peter (born in 1950), former football player from East Germany.

 

Samuel Peter (born in 1980) heavyweight boxer from the country of Nigeria.

 

Philipp Peter (born in 1969) racing car driver from the country of Austria.

 

John Peter (1937-1998) field hockey player from the country of India.

 

John Peter (1921-1983) literary scholar and novelist from the country of Canada.

 

Friedrich Peter (1921-2005) who became the leader of the FPO Parliament Group in 1970, and won the Grosses Verdienstkreuz mit Stern, and who was a politician from Austria.

Peter Family Gift Ideas

Browse Peter family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Bowhay, co. Devon. Visit. Devon, 1620; descended from William Peter, younger brother of John Petre, of Torr Newton, ancestor of the Lords Petre, of Writtle; John Peter, Esq., the last of the Bowhay branch, d. in 1643, leaving an only dau. and heir, m. to Sir Allen Apsley, ancestor in the female line of Earl Bathurst). Mottoes—Sans Dieu rien; and, Sub libertate quietem. (Chyverton and Harlyn, co. Cornwall; descended from the marriage of Thomas Peter, third son of John Peter, Esq., of Bowhay, M.P. for Exeter, temp. Mary I., with Elizabeth, only dau. and heir of Henry Mitchell, Esq.). Gu. on a bend or, betw. two escallops ar. a Cornish chough ppr. enclosed by as many cinquefoils az. Crest—Two lions’ heads erased and endorsed, the dexter or, the sinister az. gorged with a plain collar, counterchanged.
2) (co. Essex). Gu. on a bend (sometimes a chev.) or, betw. two escallops ar. a Cornish chough ppr. enclosed by as many cinquefoils az. on a chief of the second a rose betw. two fleurs-de-lis of the first, seeded or, barbed and leaved vert. Crest—Two lions’ heads erased, conjoined and endorsed, the dexter or, the sinister az. collared and ringed, counterchanged.
3) Gu. on a bend or, a martlet sa. on a chief of the second a rose betw. two cinquefoils az. Same Crest as the last.
4) (Ingatestone, co. Essex). Gu. on a bend or, betw. two escallops ar. a Cornish chough ppr. betw. as many cinquefoils az. a chief of the second charged with a cross betw. two demi fleurs-de-lis of the first.
5) Ar. a chev. gu. betw. three leopards’ faces of the second.
6) Gu. a bend or, betw. two escallops ar.
7) (Brigadier-General Thomas Peter, of Corsbasket, co. Forfar, 1806). Motto—Pour mon Dieu. Vert a crescent betw. three pairs of keys in saltire or. Crest—Out of a mural crown ar. masoned sa. a dexter arm in armour vambraced, grasping a scymitar ppr.
8) (Platbridge, co. Lancaster). Motto—Sans Dieu rien. Gu. a bend or, betw. two escallops ar. Crest—Two lions’ heads erased and addorsed, the dexter or, the sinister az. each gorged with a plain collar counterchanged.
9) (Black Friars, Canterbury, co. Kent). Or, three roses gu. Crest—An arm holding a rose sprig ppr.
10) (London; granted 1748). Or, a lion ramp. sa. on a chief of the last three mascles of the first. Crest—A swan, reguard. ppr. gorged with a ducal coronet sa. reposing the dexter foot on a mascle or.
11) (London). Gu. on a bend or, betw. two escallops ar. a Cornish chough ppr. enclosed by as many cinquefoils az.
12) (Newcastle-on-Tyne). Motto—Absque Deo nihil. Sa. on a bend erm. cotised engr. or, betw. two cinquefoils of the last a hurt enclosed by as many escallops az. Crest—A lion’s head erased erm. charged with a bend engr. betw. two escallops az.
13) (London). Gu. a bend ar. betw. two escallops or, on a chief of the last a cinquefoil enclosed by as many fleurs- de-lis az. Crest—A buckle ar.
14) (London; James Peters, Esq., of Park Street, Grosvenor Square). Motto—Invidiâ major. Or, a lion ramp. sa. on a chief of the second three mascles of the field. Crest—A swan wings endorsed reguard. ar. ducally gorged or, reposing the dexter foot on a mascle sa.
15) (Rev. Michael Nowell Peters, Vicar of Madron, co. Cornwall). Gu. on a bend or, betw. two escallops ar. a Cornish chough ppr. enclosed by as many cinquefoils az. Crest—Two lions’ heads erased and addorsed, the dexter or, the sinister az.
16) (Parsons-Peters; William Parsons-Peters, Esq., Yeabridge, co. Somerset). Motto—Fidelitas et veritas. Az. on a fesse betw. five escallops, three ia chief, and two in base ar. as many lozenges conjoined of the first. Crest—A horse’s head ar. crusily az. holding in the mouth a cinquefoil slipped vert.
17) (Kilburn, and Westbourne Terrace, Bayswater). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, or, a lion ramp. sa., on a chief of the second three mascles of the first; 2nd and 3rd, ar. a buglehorn stringed betw. three double attires all sa., for Winpenny. Crests—Peters: A swan reguard. ppr. resting the dexter foot on a mascle or; Winpenny: A griffin’s head couped ppr. holding by the string a buglehorn az.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
6. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P65
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281
15. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 100
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P47