Reeder Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Reeder Family Coat of Arms

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Reeder Coat of Arms Meaning

Reeder Name Origin & History

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Reeder Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Reeder blazon are the crescent, leopard’s face and fess. The three main tinctures (colors) are ermine, azure and or .

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 1A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

The leopard’s face (sometimes, incorrectly referred to as a leopard’s head occurs very frequently in heraldry 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion. Early heraldic artists tended to treat lions and leopards as the same animal, but during the development of British Heraldry the heads of the two creatures have adopted separate, and more realistic forms. Wade would have us associate leopards with warriors, especially those who overcome ”hazardous things by force and courage” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P65

The fesse (also found as fess) is one of the major ordinaries to found in heraldry, being a bold, broad, horizontal band across the centre of the shield. It may originally have arisen from the planks of which a wooden shield can be constructed, the centremost plank being painted a different colour 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse. It is instantly recognisable as a symbol, for example the arms of COLEVILLE granted during the reign of Hery III are simply or, a fesse gules. With this clear association with the construction of the shield itself, Wade believes that the fesse can be taken to be associated with the military, as a “girdle of honour”.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Reeder Name

REEDER

The name Reeder is of Anglo-Saxon/English which is considered occupational in origin, deriving from craftsmen who fashioned the thatched roofs of cottages and homes . Reeder is a compound of two medieval English words, hreod which translates “to thatch” or “woven with reeds” and er which translates to “man” or “person”.

Surnames in Britain prior to the Norman conquest were largely unheard of. In the small settlements and villages which existed during earlier times, residents found little need for surnames as everyone in these communities new each other and a given name would usually suffice. However, with the passage of time, population growth and expansions of communities as villages gave way to towns and cities, it became necessary to add a qualifier to a people’s names to distinguish them, one from another. Therefore one person may have been identified by their given name plus their occupation while another may have been identified by their given name and one of their parent’s names. The introduction of surnames by the Norman aristocracy after the invasion seemed to be the next logical step in this evolution. There was a boundless supply from which surnames could be formed, in addition to the use of patriarchal/matriarchal names or reference to the individuals occupational, there were things such as defining physical traits, to a familiar geographical location or a topographical landmark found near the individuals home or birthplace, the name of the village in which the person lived, and so much more. Soon, surnames would come not just to represent an individual but whole families.

There often exists variations in spelling of many surname’s, as with many names which date back to the early centuries. The variation in spelling of both given and surnames during this time period can be attributed to a lack of continuity regarding guidelines for spelling which was compounded by the diversity of languages in use in European countries at this time. The variations in the spelling of the surname Milton include but not limited to; Reeder, Reader, Readers, and Reder among others.

The earliest record of any variation of this surname is that of Adam le Redere which appears in the Cambridgeshire tax rolls from 1273. These rolls, were a series of census and tax records kept by the English Treasury by order of King Edward I, with the oldest dating back to the 12th century. They hold the distinction of being the oldest consecutive set of records detailing English governance in the United Kingdom. These records span a period of over 700 years and have proven invaluable to researches over the years. Additional tax rolls show records of Symon le Redere from Suffolk in 1279 and William Redere who lived in Norfolk was the rector of Baldswell as of 1429.

The first recorded immigrant to America bearing the surname or any variation of the spelling was David Reeder who arrived in 1630 and settled in Salem, Massachusetts. Micheal Reeder landed and settled in Pennsylvania in 1741 and Jacob Reeder arrived and settled in Pennsylvania in 1742.

There were also many immigrants to the British Common Wealth countries of Canada and Australia bearing the surname Reeder. Brothers, Evan and William Reeder landed in 1831 and settled in Canada as did Moses Reeder in 1841. Brothers, John Reeder landed in 1823 and settled in Australia.

Worldwide, the highest concentration of people with the surname Lockwood are found in the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand . By state, the largest percentile of those with the surname Reeder live in Utah.

There are many persons of note who bear the surname Reeder. Major-General William Oliver Reeder was an American military officer who served in the United States Army and was a World War II veteran. Included in his service to his country, Reeder was the Commandant of the Army Signal, Assistant Chief of Staff in the Southern Pacific Region during World War II, and Deputy Director for Commands and Services’ Logistics Division, General Staff of the U.S. Army. For meritorious service, he was awarded the Legion of Merit Award.

Andrew Reeder was born in Easton, Pennsylvania. He studied law and became the first governor of the Kansas Territory.

Carolyn Reeder was born in Washington, D.C. and was an award winning author of children’s books on historical fiction, having won the Scott O’Dell Award for Historical and an author of adult non-fiction. Reeder was also a contributing editor to the Washington Post where she wrote a children’s column on history.

Reeder Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(co. Lincoln, and Hull, co. York). Ermine on a fess azure a leopard’s face between two crescents or. Crest—A leopard's head azure collared or.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P65
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse