Scott Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Scott Family Coat of Arms

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Scott Coat of Arms Meaning

Scott Name Origin & History

Variations of this name: Scot, Scote.

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Scott Coat of Arms Meaning

The three most common symbols in the Scott coat of arms or family crest in heraldry are the stag, crescent, and bend.

We should be surprised to find the stag or buck, noble quarry of many a mediaeval hunt, being illustrated in many a coat of arms. It shares many of the poses to be found with the lion, but also one almost unique to the deer, grazing, as if the animal is still unaware of the hunter’s approach. In common with all symbols related to the hunt we probably need look further for their intended meaning than the pleasure taken by the holder in such pursuits!

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory.

The bend is a distinctive part of the shield, frequently occuring and clearly visible from a distance – it is a broad band running from top left to bottom right. Indeed, so important is the bend that it was the subject of one of the earliest cases before the English Court of Chivalry; the famous case of 1390, Scrope vs Grosvenor had to decide which family were the rightful owners of Azure, a bend or (A blue shield, with yellow bend). The bend is held in high honour and may signify “defence or protection” and often borne by those of high military rank.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Scott Name

Surname Name Meaning, Origin, and Etymology
This Celtic last name is a locational one meaning “the Scot”, referring to a person who came from Scotland. The name was originally spelled with one letter T, but the second T is almost universal today. It derives from the Old English word scotti, and in ancient times, it denoted an Irishman, not a Scotsman, and particularly a person from Gael who had taken part in conquering the coast of western Scotland in the 400s AD. Wikipedia states the name derives from the “Anglo-Scottish border and its medieval border clans”.  However, other historical authorities assert the name was always associated with Scotland and not the early Irish medieval Gaelic Kingdom of DalRiada. The ancestors of this family trace their roots back to the Boernician tribe (ancient Picts, Angles, and Vikings that lived on the English-Scottish border). The family originally lived in Roxburgh, Scotland where the held land and titles. The name appeared in England, in county Kent, during the 1300s AD.

Regarding the etymology, in his book the Etymological Dictionary of Family and Christian Names, William Arthur states the original word is Scuta in Ossian and means “restless wanderer”. Strabo (a Greek geographer, 23 AD) uses the word Scythae and Nomades synonymously Nennius (a Welsh monk, 769 AD) used the words Scythae and Scott synonymously as well.

The Duke of Buccleuch bore descended from this family and traced his ancestry or pedigree back to Richard le Scot of Murdieston in county Lanark, who was a Scottish baron who swore fealty to King Edward I of England in 1296 AD. The Scotts of Ancrum and Duninald claim their genealogy is traced to the known “wizard”, Michael Scott, who lived in the 1100s AD, and was a scholar, mathematician, astronomer, and alchemist known as “the Wizard of the North”.

Scottish Clan
The Scott’s clan was a prominent Riding Clan on the borders. By the turn of the eleventh century, they controlled lands in Middle Marches, Ewesdale, Buccleuch, Liddesdale, and Balweariel. The clan’s motto is Amo, meaning I love, and its war cry is ‘a Bellendaine and The Scotts are out! Its crest or clan badge is a stag trippant (heraldic term for a deer walking). The clan is seated at Bowhill House, but it’s historical seat was Dalkeith Palace. Sir Michael Scott, the second Laird of Buccleuch was an ardent supporter of Robert the Bruce during the Wars of Scottish Independence (1296-1328).

Spelling Variations
Common spelling variants or names with similar etymologies include Scot, Scutt, Scotts, Scotter, Schotts, Skotts, and Stotach. There are also other names with Scott in the base (ex. Guscotte, Prescott, Scotter, and Scottow). Foreign equivalents include Skati or Skotti (Norse), Schotte (Dutch), Schnot (French), and Skotte (Swedish and Sanish).

Popularity & Geographic Distribution
The last name ranks Stevens ranks 36th in popularity in terms in the United Status as of the 2000 Census. The name ranks particularly high in the following nine states: Virginia, Indiana, South Carolina, Maryland, Missouri, Washington, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Delaware. The surname is also common in England, where it ranks 40th. It ranks highest in the following counties: Northumberland, Durham, Cumberland, and Buckinghamshire. The name is common throughout the English speaking world:  Scotland (12th), Wales (93rd), Ireland (337th), Canada (25th), New Zealand (9th), Australia (33rd), and South Africa (179th). The 1890 book “Homes of Family Names” by H.B. Guppy, states the following in regard to this surname: “Irregularly scattered over England. Though the Scotts are permanently established in the south coast counties, as in Devon and Kent, and, including the Scutts, in Dorset, their great home is in the counties on either side of the Scottish border, in Northumberland and Cumberland on the one side, and in the counties of Berwick, Roxburgh, and Dumfries, on the other side, and they are also numerous in southern Scotland south of the Forth and the Clyde”.

Early Bearers of the Surname
A one Uchtred filius Scot (or Scoti) was listed in the register of Kelso Abbey in 1120 AD. He is mentioned in a charter dealing with the foundation of Holyrood Abbey in Selkirk in 1120 AD. Interestingly, his personal (first name) is a common Saxon name, which calls into question the commonly accepted origins of the Celtic nature of the surname. Another early notable was Henricus le Scott in 1195 AD. An early known bearer was Roger Scott who was recorded in documents related to Danelaw in Lincolnshire in 1150 AD. The Hundred Rolls of 1273 AD, a census of Wales and England, known in Latin as Rotuli Hundredorum lists three bearers of this surname: Roger le Scot, Elias le Scot in county Salop, and Walter Scot in county York. The Poll Tax of Yorkshire in 1379 AD lists two bearers of this last name: Johannes Scot and Adam Skotte. An early marriage involving this surname was Robert Scott to Anne Payne in 1638.

History, Genealogy, and Ancestry
The earliest known ancestor of the Scott family is Uchtred fitz Scott. He was born in around 1090 AD and he had a son named Richard Scott of Rankilburn, who was born in 1115 AD. Richard in turn had a son named Michael Scott who was born in 1162 AD. This Michael married a woman named Margaret Syras and had a son with her named Duncan Scott of Murthockston. Duncan was born in 1186 AD and he had two sons: Sir Michael and Gilbert. Michael was born in 1230 and was the 1st Baron of Balwearie. He had a son named  Michael Scott of Balwearie, a Knight known as “the Wizard” who was born around 1255 AD. Michael “The Wizard” married Margaret of Balwearie and had a son with her: Sir Henry Scott, 3rd Baronet of Balwearie.

Sir Richard Scott was born in Rankilburn, Scotland in 1265 AD. He married a woman named Inglis and had a son with her named Michael. Michael was born in 1320 in Murdiestoun and had two children: John and Robert. His son Robert was born in 1346. Robert had a son named Walter Scott, who was born in 1368. Walter in turn had a son named Robert. Robert was born in 1406 AD, and he had a son named Walter. Walter was born in 1420 in Branxholm and had two issue: David and Alexander.

The famous genealogist Bernard Burke’s book “The Landed Gentry” discusses nine branches of this family:  1) Scott of Great Barr and of Ratlinghope and Norbury, 2) Scott of Rotherfield Park, 2) Scott-Chad of Thursford Hall and Colney, 3) Scott of Brotherton, 4) Scott of Malleny, 5) Scott of Gala, 6) Scott of Raeburn, 7) Scott of Abborsford,8) Scott of Willsboro, and 9) MacMillan-Scott of Wauchhope.

The first branch, Scott of Great Barr, begins with a mention of John Charles Addyes Scott, Esquire of Great Bar in county Stafford and Ratlinghope and Norbury in county Salop. He was born in 1830 and was a Justice of the Peace. In 1863, he married Mahlah, daughter of J. Homer, and had a son with her named James Robert, born in 1864. John Scott was the first member of this family to settle at Stourbridge, which was in the 17th century. His son and successor was William Scott. William married Joanna Potter. Their third son was named William. In 1683, this William married Elizabeth, daughter of William Fincher of county Stafford, and had a son with her named John. John of Stourbridge died without issue and was succeeded by his brother, William Scott. In 1720, William married Joanna, daughter of William Hunt, and had issue with her: William, John (married Elizabeth Kettle), Sarah (married Samuel Skey), Elizabeth (married Samuel Bate), and Joanna (married Samuel Ray). William was his eldest son and heir. In 1771, William married Anna, daughter of Reverend John Tonckes of Birmingham. He was succeeded by his nephew, William Scott, Esq. of Strourbridge, who was born in 1760. In 1795, William married Alicia Pynock and died without heirs. His brother was John Scott, Esq. of Stourbridge and Great Barr who was born in 1763. He was Justice of the Peace, Deputy Lieutenant, and High Sheriff of county Worcester. In 1795, he married Sarah, daughter of John Kettle, and had a daughter with her named Sarah. The Scott family crest has the following blazon in heraldry: Argent on a mount of bulrushes in base proper a bull passant sable, a chief pean, billet or, with a canton of the last. Crest:  A stag couchant proper, the dexter paw resting on a billet or, charged on the shoulder with a cross-crosslet of the last. They were seated at The Red House and The Manor House.

The second branch, Scott of Rotherfield Park, begins with a mention of George Arthur Jervoise Scott, Esq. of Rotherfield Park, Southhamtpon, who was Justice of the Peace and Deputy Lieutenant for Hants, born in 1833. In 1875, he married Mary Angela, daughter of Lord Charles Wellesley. Burke traces the lineage or pedigree or genealogy of this family back to James Scott, Esquire of Rotherfield Park. James married Martha, daughter of Thomas Bradbury Winter, Esq. of Shenley Herts, a son with her named James Winter Scott. James Winter was an Esquire of Rotherfield Park, Justice of the Peace, Deputy Lieutenant, and High Sheriff in 1864, as well as a Member of Parliament for North Hants until 1837. In 1828, he married Lucy, daughter of Reverend Sir Samuel Clarke Jervoise, and had the following children with her: George Arthur Jervoise, Walter, Jervoise, Charles James, Archibald Edward, Lucy Gertrude, Katherine Maria (married Sir Charles Hayes Miller), Elinor (married Lieutenan Colonel Sir Charles D’Oyly), and Dora (married R.W. Spicer). He died in 1873 and was succeeded by his eldest son, George Arthur Jervoise Scott, Esq. The Scott coat of arms was per pale indented argent and sable, a saltire counterchanged. Crest: An arm erect couped at the elbow habited gules cuffed ermine the hand proper, holding a roll of paper argent the arm encircled with park or pales.

The third branch, Scott-Chad, begins with a mention of Joseph Stonehewer Scott-Chad, Esq. of Thursford Hall and Colney in Norfolk, who was a Justice of the Peace and High Sheriff in 1863. He was born in 1829 and in 1856, he married Edith Elizabeth, youngest daughter of J.J. Rawlinson of Graythwaite in county Lancaster and had the following children with her: Charles, Cecilia, Mary and Catherine. He was the son of Joseph Scott and Louisa Elizabeth Tomlinson. Burke traces the lineage or genealogy of this branch back to Robert Chad of Wells, who was born in 1630 and married Frances Tidd. The Scott family crest was per pale gules and argent, a cross potent, in the 1st and 4th quarters a rose, in the 2nd and 3rd  a cross pate, all counterchanged, for Chad, quartering Scott.

The fourth branch, Scott of Brotherton, begins with a mention of Hercules Scott of Brotherton in county Kincardine, who was Justice of the Peace, Deputy Lieutenant, and Captain 2nd Kincardine Artillery Volunteers. He was born in 1823 and in 1857 he married Anna, daughter of James Moon of Liverpool and had issue with her: Hercules James (1850), Edward Uchtred (1857), Mary Isabella (1869), Helen (1869), Anna Katherine, and Margaret Rose de Noel. Burke states the family is a branch of Scott of Logie in county Forfar. Hercules Scott was born in 1621, the son of James Scott. He had a son named Hercules Scott in 1659. This Hercules married Helen, daughter of Sir Charles Ramsay, in 1707. They had eight children together: James (of Brotherton), David (born 1725, of Nether Benholm), Elizabeth (married James Mill), Jean, Margaret, Helen, Mary, and Katharine. His eldest son was James Scott, born in 1719, but died without heirs and was succeeded by his nephew Colonel Hercules Scott. He in turn died and was succeeded by his brother, James Scott born in 1776. James died in 1844 and was succeeded by his brother, David Scott, Esq. of Brotherton. David was born in 1782 and was Justice of the Peace and Deputy Lieutenant. In 1813, he married Mary, daughter of William Seddon, and had the following issue with her: Hercules (mentioned above), Wallace Mary (married Walter Butler), Helen (married Alexander Porteuous), Isabella, Penelope Eliza (married Edward Ward Dickson), Emily Augusta (married Joseph St. John Yates), Flora Alieia, Anna Maria (married George Skene Taylor), Diana Octavia (married James Farquhar of Hallgreen). The Scott family crest was: Argent, on a fess crenelle betwixt three lions’ heads, erased gules, a star to denote the 3rd son. Crest: A lion rampant with a sword in the dexter paw.

The fifth branch, Scott of Malleny, begins with a mention of Francis Cunningham Scott, C.B., Major 42nd Highlanders born in 1834. He was a Justice of the Peace in Mid-Lothian and in 1859 he married Mary Olivia, daughter of Rev. E.J. Ward, Rector of Earl Clandon, Surrey, and had issue with her: Carteret Cunningham, Florence Emily Cunningham, and Ethel Mary Cunningham. This family has the same roots and ancestry as the noble House of Buccleauch. John Scott, Esquire, was the second son of Sir William Scott of Clerkington, one of the Senators of the College of Justice. He married Anne, daughter of Sir Thomas Nicholson, and had two daughters and two sons with her: John and William (Advocate of the Scottish Bar). His died was Thomas, who married Isabel, daughter of Sir John Lauder, of Fountain Hall. He was succeeded by his son, John Scott, Esq. of Malleney. In 1742, John married Susan, daughter of Lord William Hay of Newhall, and had the following children with her: Thomas, James (commanded a ship in Indian), Alexander (Major in the army), Archibald, Francis Cateret (married Charlotte Elizabeth Cunningham), Hamilton, George, Margaret, Jane, Susan, and Molly. He was succeeded by his son Thomas. Thomas, an Esquire of Malleny, was an officer who served with distinction under Prince Ferdinand in the American Revolution, in Holland, and in India. He was succeeded by his nephew: Carteret George Scott. He was a Justice of the Peace, Deputy Lieutenant, and Captain. His second wife was Emily, daughter of Admiral Francis Holmes Coffin, and had two children with her: Francis Cunningham and George. He died and was succeeded by his son, Colonel Francis C. Scott. The Scott coat of arms in heraldry had the following blazon: Or, on a bend azure a star, between two crescents of the first, for Scott of Buccleuch, and for difference, in base an arrow bendways proper feathered and barged argent. Crest: A stag lodged proper.

The sixth branch, Scott of Gala, begins with a mention of John Henry Francis Kinnaird Scott, Esquire of Gala in county Selkirk who was born in May of 1859. Burke traces the Scott genealogy back to Sir Walter Scott of Harden, the ninth generation of the Scotts of Harden, who married Mary Scott “the Flower of Yarrow”, who was the daughter of Philip Scott of Dryhope. Walter died in 1629 and was succeeded by his heir, Sir William, ancestor to the Scotts of Harden. Hugh Schott, the younger son, married Jean, daughter of Sir James Pringle. Through his wife, he became the proprietor of Gala and Galashields, and founded the House of Scott of Gala. His direct descendant was John Scott of Gala. John  married Anne, daughter of Sir George Makdougall, and had issue with her: Hugh, George (an Admiral who married Caroline Lucy Douglas) and John (had three daughters). His son and heir was Colonel Hugh Scott, who married Isaballea Munro of Auchenbowie. They had a son together named John. In 1820, this John married Madalen Hope, daughter of Sir Archibald Hope. They had the following issue: Hugh, Archibald (Captain of Edinburgh County Militia), Elizabeth, and Isabella. He died in 1840 and was succeeded by his son Hugh. This Hugh was the Major of Dumfries, Roxburgh, and Selkirk Militia. He was also Deputy Lieutenant of Selkirk. In 1857, he married Elizabeth Isabella, daughter of Captain Charles Kinnaird Johnstone Gordon. They had children together: John Henry, Hugh James, Charles Archibald, and Madalen Augusta Lavania. He died in 1877 and was succeeded by John (mentioned above). This Scott family crest was blazoned as follows: Quarterly, 1st and 4th, or, on a bend azure a star six points between two crescents of the field, in the sinister chief point a rose gules stalked and leaved vert for Scottl 2nd and 3rd argent; on a saltire engrailed sables five escallops or, for Pringle, of Galashiels.

The seven branch, Scott of Raeburn, begins with a mention of Robert Scott, Esquire of Raeburn in county Dumfries who was Justice of the Peace for county Roxburgh, born in 1817. He succeeded his father in 1855 and in 1861, he married Louisa, daughter of William Campbell of Ederline and had five children with her: Walter (1866), Matilda Wishart, Susan Horsburgh, Louisa, and Violet Georgina Margaret. Burke traces the genealogy back to Walter Scott, third son of Sir William, who married Isabel, daughter of William Macdougall of Makerstoun. They had issue together: William, Walter, Isobel, and Christian (married James Menzies). His heir was William Scott of Raeburn who married Anne, daughter of Sir John Scott of Ancrum, and had issue with her: Walter and Isobel. The lineage goes on for another page, and ends with Charlotte Harriett Jane Hope Scott of Abbotsford, who married James Robert Hope in 1847 and had issue with him: Walter Michael (1857), Mary Monica, and Margaret Anne. The Scott coat of arms was: Quarterly; 1st and 4th, or, two mullets in chief and a crescent in base argent within an orle of the last, for Scott; 2nd and 3rd, or, on a bend azure, buckle erect of the 2nd, for Haliburton.

The eight branch, Scott of Willsboro, begins with a mention of William Edward Scott of county Londonderry who was Justice of the Peace, Deputy Lieutenant, and High Sheriff in 1857. He was Captain and Major of the Londonderry Militia as well. He was born in 1833 and in 1861 he married Catherine Georgina, daughter of Alexander Stuart, and had issue with her: Thomas George, Katherine Elizabeth, and Anne Frances. Burke traces the lineage, ancestry, or genealogy back to the Reverend Gideon Scott, who was educated at Oxford and went to Ireland as Chaplain in King William’s army in 1688. He married Jane, daughter of Robert McNeill of Ballintoy, and had a son with her named William. William was born in 1704 and was Recorded and Member of Parliament for Londonderry. He became the Baron of the Exchequer, and married Hannah Gledstanes in 1722, having a son with her named James, born in 1745. In 1779, James married Catherine Elizabeth, daughter of James Leslie. They had children: Thomas, William, Edward (army Major), Richard, George (Rector of Banagher), Charles (married Jane Farrell), James Leslie Montogmery (Chancellor of Down), Joice (married Robert Ogilby), Hannah, and Maryanne Martha. He died in 1820 and his heir was Thomas Scott, Esq. of Willsboro. The lineage goes on and concludes with the blazon for this Scott family crest: Or, on a bend azure, a star between two crescents of the field.

The ninth and last branch, MacMillan-Scott of Wauchhope, begins with a mention of Walter MacMillan Scott, Esquire of Wauchope in the parish of Hobkirk in county Roxburgh, Captain of Scottish Borderers Militia and a Lieutenant of the 6th Dragoon Guards (aka the Carabineers). The family bore the following coat of arms in heraldry: Quarterly, 1st and 4th, or, on a bend azure a millet between crescents of the first, a border compony of the second and first, for Scott; 2nd and 3rd, per pale or and argent, a lion rampant sable in chief, three mullets azure for MacMillan. Burke traces the family lineage and ancestry back to Walter Scott, Laird of Buccleuch, the great-great-grandfather of the 1st Earl of Buccleuch. His son was Walter Scott of Goudilands, born in 1533.

Robert J. Scott was born in 1818 in Culpepper, Virginia. He married Atlantic Phillips and had issue with her: William W., Louisa R. (Little), Abner A., Malinda Lucinda, Matteson Lee, Milly E., Emma Ann, and Elezebeth (Arthur).

A one William Douglass Scott was born before 1850 and he married twice in Australia: Agnes Raymond Day (1864) and Aphrasia C. Day (1887), and had the following children: Isabel Margaret (Larkin), Lilian Agnes (Treasure), Linda Mary Sarah (Johnson), Leslie D., Ethel Aphrasia, Agnes, Edward Irwin Charles, Stanley Ernest, Honoria J. and Mabel. His daughter Leslie D. Scott was born in 1869 in Macleay River, New South Wales.

Thomas S. Scott was born in 1828 in Ireland and he moved to Canada where he died in 1917 in Ontario. He had three sons: James Wesley, William, and Hamilton. His son James Wesley was born in 1852 in Kennebec and he married Susannah T. McLaren, with whom he had three sons: Archibald, Thomas, and Walter. His son Thomas was born in 1882 in Westmeath, Renfrew. His son Walter was born in 1884 ion Beachburg and he married Mabel Cassiday.

Early American and New World Settlers
Henry Scott was recorded as living in Virginia in 1623, perhaps in James Cittye, as was Robert Scottesmore, Walter Scott, and Goodwife Scott. Walter Scott came to Virginia aboard the Hercules in 1618, and Apphia Scott came aboard the Gift the same year. A one Percis Scott was born in Virginia around this time. John Scott came to the Barbados aboard the Faulcon in April of 1635. Elizabeth Scott came to the Island of Providence (a colony of English Puritans near modern day Colombia) aboard the Expectacion in April of 1635. Jane Scott came to Virginia aboard the Thomas & John in June of 1635. John Scott came to Virginia from the port of London aboard the Paule in July of 1635. James Scott came to Virginia aboard the Globe in August of 1635. William Scott came to Virginia aboard the George in August of 1635. Joseph Scott came to the Barbados aboard the Falcon in December 1635. A one Martha Scott, aged 60 years, came to New England aboard the Elizabeth of Ipswich. A one Thomas Scott (with children Abigail, Thomas, and Elizabeth) also came in the same ship. Other early settlers in colonial America bearing the Scott surname include: Daniel (Virginia 1633), Edward (Virginia 1702), Anne (Virginia 1703), Edward (Maryland 1716), and Janet (New England 1724). There were also Scotts present in Canada in the eighteenth century, including the following immigrants who came to Nova Scotia in 1749: James, Joesph, Richard, and Rosana. The following people came to Quebec in 1815 aboard the Atlas: Thomas, Janet, Agnes, and Jane.

Mottoes
I have identified 56 Scott family mottoes, most of which are Latin, a few of which I have been unable to translate properly into English:

1) Amo – I love
2) Amo inspicio – Like inspect (?)
3) Amo probos – I love the virtuous
4) Amore patriae – By patriotism
5) Aut tace ant face – Either be silent or act (Scott of Comeston)
6) Ardenter amo – I love fervently
7) Aut tace aut face – Keep quiet or torch
8) Bien ou rien – All or nothing
9) Crescendo prosim – Let me do good by increasing
10) Doe weel and let them say – Do well and let them say (Scot of Orkney)
11) Domini factum est – It is the Lord’s doing (Scott of Moreton)
12) Donec rursus impleat orbem – Until it again fill its orb (Scott bt. Somervil)
13) Facundia felix – Happy eloquence
14) Fear to trangress – Fear to trangress
15) Fidelitas – Fidelity (Scott of Edinburgh)
16) Fides probata coronat – Approved faith confers a crown
17) Fidus et fortis – Faithful and brave (Scott of Castle House)
18) Fortis et placabilis – Brave and placable (Scot of Bonholm)
19) Free – Free
20) Hic totus nutrior – Unknown
21) In recto decus – Honour in acting right
22) In tenebris lux  – Light in darkness
23) Lucet – Shines
24) Me fortem reddit Deus – God makes me strong
25) Memor et fidelis – Just and faithful
26) Miseris succurro – I succour the wretched
27) Nemo sibi nascitur – No one is born for himself aline
28) Nescit amor fines – Love knows no bounds
29) Non invita Minerva – Nothing against Minerva
30) Nunquam libertas gratior – Never was liberty more agreeable (Scott of Stourbridge)
31) Obstando supera – Overcome by resisting
32) Pacem amo – I love peace (Scot of Broadmeadows, Scott of Highchester)
33) Paterno rebore tutus – Unknown
34) Patriam amo – I love my country
35) Potior origine virtus – Virtue is better than lineage
36) Pro amore patriae – For love of my country
37) Pro aris et focis – For altars and hearths
38) Prudenter amo – I love prudently (Scott of Gala)
39) Ready, aye ready – (Scott of Thirleystane, When the rest of his nobles, assembled at Fala, refused to follow James V into England, Sir John Scott of Thirlestane alone expressed his readiness. Hence James granted him an honourable augmentation to his arms.)
40) Recte faciendo neminem timeas – In acting justly fear no one (Scott of Betton)
41) Reddunt aspera fortem – Dangers render brave
42) Régi patriæque fidelis – Faithful to my king and country (Scott of Great Barr)
43) Reparabit cornua Phoebe – The moon will replenish her honrs (Scott of Abbotsford, Scott of Raeburn and Harden)
44) Sed sine labe decus – Let honour be without stain
45) Sit sine labe – Let honour be without stain
46) Spe Tires augenter – Unknown
47) Spe verus – True in hope.
48) Spe vires augentur – Our strength is increased by hope (Scott of Dunninald, Scott of Silwood)
49) Sperandum – Hopes
50) Surge illuminare – Rise and shine (?)
51) Sursum – Upwards
52) Tace aut face – Say nothing or do
53) Tenebris lux – Light in darkness (Scott of Pitlochie)
54) Trusted and true – (Scott of Hussindene)
55) Vive la plume – Live the pen
56) Watch weel – (Scott of Abbotsford)

 

Grantees
We have 100 coats of arms for the Drew or Drewe surname depicted here. These 100 blazons are from Bernard Burke’s book The General Armory of England, Ireland, and Scotland, which was published in 1848. The bottom of this page contains the blazons, and in many instances contains some historical, geographical, and genealogical about where coat of arms was found and who bore it. People with this last name that bore a Scott Coat of Arms include:

1) Scott, wife of William Jameson, of Cork, Ireland [1779]
2) Scott, after Fenton, William, of co. York. Quarterly Arms, [1785]
3) Sir Samuel Scott, Bart., and Eyre, wife of, of London. Escutcheon of pretence,[1795]
4) Claude Scott, Ommaney, wife of, of London
5) Scott to Waring, of Bromley, co. Kent, and Shrewsbury and Hayes, Shropsh., 1797
6) Scott of Bromley, co. Kent, [1817]
7) Sir John, Knt., Baron Eldon [18 July 1799], Chief Justice of Cora. Pleas, of co. Northumberland and
Dorset, Arms and Supporters, [1799]
8) Scott of Lambs Conduit Street, London, [1806]
9) Sir Joseph Scott, Bart., of Great Barr Hall, county Stafford
10) Scott before Stonehewer, (Match), [1811]
11)Scott-Stonehewer, of Austin Friars and Cannon Street, London, and Abington Hall, co. Canib., [1825]
12) Scott, late Phillips (Spr.), reputed dau. of Scott, of Bank Fee House, co. Glouc, [1816]
13) Scott, Baron Stowell [17 Julv 1821], of co. Glouc. Supporters, [1821]
14) Scott before Douglas, [Sir John James, 4th] Bart. [10 July 1822], of Scotland
15) Scott, late Skues, . . . ., of Saltash, co. Cornw., and Devonport, co. Devon, His Majesty’s Coinager of
Devon and Cornwall, [1827]
16) Scott of Red House. Great Barr, co. Staff., and Stourbridge, co. Wore, [1829]
17) Scott, late Wellbeloved, Robert, of Stourbridge, co. Wore, and the Middle Temple, London (and
Scott, his wife), [1830]
18) Scott, Maj.-Gen. Sir Hopton S., K.C.B., of Madras, 7 May 1835
19) Scott, late Moss,(widow aud son), of co. Glouc, [1838?]
20) Scott, of Colney Hall, co. Norf., [1855]
21) Scott-Chad . . . ., of Colney Hall and Thurford, Pinkney, co. Norf., [1855]
22) Scott, Maj.-Gen., C.B., [1860]
23) Scott after Johnstone, . . . ., of co. York (Baron Derwent’s family), [1860]
24) Scott of Oakbank, Wethered, co. Camb., [1870]
25) D. a., of Hougham, co. Norf., 1890,
26) Mrs., of Belton Strange House, Chad, Shropsh., 1892,
27) Rev. Thomas Scard, Vicar, Holy Trinity Church, Penge, co. Kent, 1882
28) Scott-Gatty, Alfred Scott-, York Herald of Arms, of London, 1893

Notables
Famous people with this last name include: 1) Timothy Eugene Scott (1965) who is an African American Senator from South Carolina, 2) Septumus Edwin Scott (1879-1965) who was a British painter and illustrator, 3) Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832) who was a famous Scottish playwright, novelist, and poet, 4) Winfield Scott (1786-1866) who was an General in the United States during who became a Mexican-American War and was the presidential candidate for the Whig Part in 1852, 5) Walter Dill Scott (1869-1955) who was a pioneer in applied psychology and the president of Northwestern University in the early nineteenth century, 6) Ridley Scott (1937) who is an English movie director and producer known for movies such as Alien, Thelma & Louise, and Gladiator, 7) Duncan Campell Scott (1862-1947) who was a Canadian poet and civil servant known for advocating First Nations people, and 8) Ian Gilmour Sxott (1934-2006) who was a lawyer who became the Attorney General of Ontario in 1985. It should be noted there is also a famous fictional character known as Michael Scott, from the famous American TV sitcom The Office.

Scott Family Gift Ideas

Browse Scott family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) or Scot - (Earl of Chester, extinct 1244). Or, three piles gu.
2) or Scot - (co. Essex). Per pale indented ar. and sa. a saltire counterchanged.
3) or Scot - (co. Kent). Ar. a cross botonnée sa.
4) or Scot - (co. Kent). Sa. an inescuteheon within an orle of owls ar.
5) or Scott - (Camberwell, co. Surrey). Ar. on a fess sa. three boars’ heads couped or (another, ar.). Crest—A boar’s head couped ar. a pheon stuck fessways in the neck sa. Another Crest—A cup flammant ppr.
6) Ar. on a chev. sa. three gauntlets or (another, headpieces).
7) Ar. within a double tressure flory counterflory gu. an inescutcheon betw. three garbs of the second.
8) or Scot -Per chev. erminois and ar. on a chev. betw. three lions' heads erased az. five bezants. Crest—A. lion's head erased per chev. or and ar. charged with a chev. az. thereon five bezants as in the arms.
9) (Mollance, co. Kirkcudbright). Per pale or and az. cn a bend a mullet betw. two crescents counterchanged, in sinister chief a horseshoe of the first. Crest—A stag trippant gu. attired and unguled or, charged on the shoulder with a horseshoe also or. Motto—Amo.
10) (Redfordhill, co. Peebles, 1878). Or, on a bend az. betw. two annulets sa. a mullet betw. two crescents ar. stag's head ppr. Motto—Memor et fidelis.
11) (Rev. Thomas Scard Scott, M.A. Oxford, Vicar of Holy Trinity, Penge, co. Surrey, and the other descendants of Capt. John Scott, R.N.). Az on a fesse ar. betw. two mascles in chief or and a bull pass, in base of the second, an anchor erect betw. two cinquefoils of the first Crest—A sun rising in splendour from behind waves of the sea, surmounted by a rainbow all ppr. Motto—Surge illuminare.
12) (Murdiston, Branxholm and Buccleugh, Scotland). Or, on a bend az. a mullet betw. two crescents of the field. Prior to the 17th century, the bend was charged with two crescents, and in the upper part a mullet.
13) (Montagy-Douglas-Scott, Duke of Buccleuch). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, the royal arms of King Charles II. (viz., quarterly, 1st and 4th, France and England, quarterly; 2nd, Scotland, 3rd, Ireland), debruised by a baton sinister ar.; 2nd, or, on a bend az. a mullet of six points betw. two crescents of the field, for Scott; 3rd, quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. a human heart gu. crowned with an imperial crown or, and on a chief az. three mullets of the field, for Douglas, 2nd and 3rd, az. a bend betw. six cross crosslets fitchée or, for Mar; the whole of this quarter within a bordure or, charged with the double tressure of Scotland gu. Crest—A stag trippant ppr. attired and unguled or. Supporters— Two females richly attired in antique habits vert, their under robes az. the uppermost ar. and upon their heads plumes of three ostrich feathers of the last. Motto—Amo.
14) (Earl of Deloraine, extinct 1807; Lord Henry Scott, second son of James, Duke of Monmouth, by Anne, Duchess of Buccleuch, his wife, was so created 1706). Or, on a bend az. a star betw. two crescents of the field. Crest, Supporters, and Motto, same as the Duke of Buccleuch, a crescent for diff.
15) (The Hague, 1680). Per fess or and gu. in chief a bend az. charged with a star of six points betw. two crescents of the first, in base an eagle's leg couped at the thigh in pale or. Crest—An eagle rising or, and looking up to the sun appearing from under a cloud ppr. Supporters—Two ladies richly attired, each holding in her hand a thistle slipped ppr. Motto—Amo inspicio.
16) (Gorrenberry, 1672). Or, on a bend az. a star betw. two crescents of the field, a bordure compony gu. and ar. Crest—An anchor in pale enwrapt with a cable ppr. Motto—Sperandum.
17) (Thirlstane, co. Selkirk) bart., 1666, now represented by Lord Napier and Ettrick). Or, on a bend az. a mullet pierced betw. two crescents of the first, a double tressure flory counterflory of the second. Crest—Issuing out of a mural crown six lances with pennons, three and three, disposed in saltire az. Supporters—Two men in coats of mail with steel caps, each holding in his hand a spear with pennons all ppr. Motto—Ready, aye ready.
18) (Scotstarvit, co. Fife). Or, on a bend a star betw. two crescents of the field, a bordure engr. gu. Crest—A dexter hand erected holding an annulet in which is set a carbuncle ppr. Motto—In tenebris lux.
19) (Balcomie, co. Fife, 1773). As Scotstarvit, with a crescent gu. in chief for diff. Same Crest and Motto.
20) (Pitlochie, 1672). As Scotstarvit, with a mullet in chief for diff. Same Crest and Motto.
21) (Lethem, 1672). As Scotstarvit, with a martlet in chief for diff. Same Crest and Motto.
22) (Sheriff Clerk of Edinburgh, 1672). As Scotstarvit, the bordure charged with eight bezants. Crest—A dexter arm, the hand holding a half expanded book ppr. Motto—Fidelitas.
23) (Vogrie, co. Edinburgh). Or, on a bend az. a star betw. two crescents of the field, a bordure per pale gu. and ar. the dexter side engr. the sinister indented. Crest—A dexter hand holding a ring ppr. Motto—Nescit amor fines.
24) (Orkney, 1672). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, as Scotstarvit, with a crescent for diff.; 2nd and 3rd, az. three boars’ heads couped or, within a bordure indented of the last, for Gordon, of Cluny. Crest—A boar's head couped or, holding in the mouth four arrows gu. feathered and headed ar. Motto—Doe weel and let them say.
25) (Balmouth, 1672). Or, on a bend az. a star betw. two crescents of the field, a bordure quarterly gu. and ar. Crest—A star or. Motto—Lucet.
26) (Whytslaid, 1672). Or, on a bend az. a star betw. two crescents of the field, in chief a broken lance gu. Crest—A dexter hand holding a broken lance gu. Motto—Pro amore patriae.
27) (Toderick). As the last, with a crescent for diff. Crest—The head of a lance ppr. Motto—Pro aris et focis.
28) (Burnhead, co. Roxburgh, 1755). Or, on a bend az. a star betw. two crescents of the field, a bordure of the second. Crest—A buck’s head and neck erased ppr. collared az. the collar charged with a star betw. two crescents or, all surrounded by two branches of laurel ppr. Mottoes—In recto decus; and, Nemo sibi nascitur.
29) (Hassendean, 1672). Or, on a bend az. a star of six points betw. two crescents ar. in base a bow and arrow of the second. Crest—A hand holding a pole-axe ppr. Motto—Trustie and true.
30) (Malleny, co. Edinbnrgh). Or, on a bend az. a star of six points betw. two crescents of the field, in base an arrow bendways ppr. feathered, headed, and barbed ar. Crest—A stag lodged ppr. attired or. Motto—Amo probos.
31) (Bevillaw, 1672). Or, on a fess az. a star of six points betw. two crescents of the field. Crest—A hand holding a scroll of paper ppr. Motto—Facundia felix.
32) (Horseley Hill, 1735). Or, on a bend az. a star betw. two crescents of the first, in dexter chief a sword in pale ppr. Crest- A lion’s head erased ppr. Motto—Pro patria.
33) (Harwood, 1672). Or, an oak tree vert surmounted of a bend az. charged with a star of six points betw. two crescents of the field. Crest—A stag's head erased ppr. Motto—Ardenter amo.
34) (Trabrown, 1765). Or, on a bend az. a mullet pierced betw. two crescents of the field, a bordure engr. sa. charged with four escallops of the first. Crest—A stag at gaze ppr. Motto—Free.
35) (Sinton, co. Roxburgh, represented, 1672, by Bonraw). Or, two mullets in chief and a crescent in base az. Crest—A nymph, in her dexter hand the sun, in her sinister the moon all ppr. Motto—Reparabit cornua Phoebe.
36) (Harden, co. Roxburgh, a cadet of Sinton, 1672). Or, on a bend az. a star of six points betw. two crescents of the field, in sinister chief a rose gu. slipped and barbed ppr. Crest—A stag trippant armed with ten tynes ppr. Motto—Pacem amo. In 1700, as representative of Sinton, the arms, crest, and motto of Sinton, with two mermaids, each holding in her hand a mirror ppr. for supporters.
"37) (Lord Polwarth). Quarterly, 1st and 4th grand quarters, counterquartered, 1st, vert a lion ramp, ar., for Hume, 2nd, ar. three papingoes vert, for Pepdie, 3rd, gu. three piles engr. ar., for Polwarth, 4th, ar. a cross engr. az., for Siclair; en surtout, Az. an orange with stalk erect slipped, and over it an imperial crown ppr., as a coat of augmentation; 2nd grand quarter, or, two mullets in chief and a crescent in base az., for Scott, of Harden; 3rd grand quarter, counterquartered, 1st and 4th, gu. on a chev. ar. a rose betw. two lions combatant of the first, 2nd and 3rd, ar. three edock leaves vert, all for Hepburn, of Humbie. Crests—In the centre, for Scott: A lady richly attired holding in her dexter hand the sun, and in her sinister the moon ppr., with the motto, Reparabit cornua Phoebe; on the dexter side, for Hume: Issuing out of a man's heart or, an arm from the elbow ppr. brandishing
a scymitar ppr. bilted and pommelled or; on the sinister side, for Hepbubn: An oak tree ppr. and horse pass. ar. saddled and bridled gu., with motto above the horse, Keep tryste. Supporters—Dexter, a lion reguard. ar.; sinister, a mermaid holding in her sinister hand and resting on her shoulder a mirror ppr. Motto—Below the shield: Fides probata coronat."
38) (Abbotsford, co. Roxburgh, bart.). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, or, two mullets in chief and a crescent in base az. within an orle of the last for Scott; 2nd and 3rd, or,on a bend az. three mascles of the field, in the sinister chief point an oval buckle erect of the second, for Haliburton. Crest—Same as Scott, of Sinton, 1672. Supporters—Dexter, a mermaid holding in the exterior hand a mirror ppr.; sinister, a savage, wreathed round the head and middle, holding in the exterior hand a club. Mottoes—Over the crest : Reparabit cornua Phoebe; and under the arms: Watch weel. These arms were confirmed in 1848 to Walter Scott Lockhart-Scott, of Abbotsford, and in 1853 to Mrs. Hope Scott, without the supporters.
39) (Thirlstane, co. Roxburgh, 1673; now Scott-Kerr, of Chatto. See Kerr). Or, on a bend az. a star of six points betw. two crescents of the field, in sinister chief a rose gu. stalked and barbed ppr. surmounted of a martlet ar. Crest—A stag trippant armed with ten tynes ppr. Motto—Pacem amo.
40) (Wall, co. Selkirk, 1672; now Plummer, of Sunderland Hall). Or, on a bend az. a star of six points betw. two crescents of the field, in sinister chief a rose gu. stalked and barbed ppr. surmounted of an annulet of the first. Crest—A stag trippant armed with ten tynes ppr. Motto—Pacem amo.
41) (Gala, co. Selkirk; as recorded 1793). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, or, on a bend az. a star betw. two crescents of the field, in chief a rose gu. barbed vert; 2nd and 3rd, ar. on a saltire engr. sa. five escallops or, for Pringle. Crest—A lady from the waist affrontée richly attired, in her sinister hand a rose gu. Motto—Prudenter amo.
42) (Sinton, 1672, later family, 1723). Or, on a bend az. a star of six points betw. two crescents of the field, on sinister chief point a rose gu. stalked and barbed vert, a bordure sa. Crest—A crescent ar. Motto—Crescendo prosim.
43) (Edinburgh, 1672). Or. on a bend betw. three lions’ heads erased gu. as many crescents of the field. Crest—A stag holding in his mouth a blade of grass ppr. Motto—Hic tutus nutrior.
44) (Elie, 16th century). Or, on a bend az. a mullet betw. two crescents of the field, a bordure gu. charged with bezants.
45) (Dryhope). Or, on a bend az. a mullet betw. two crescents of the field, a bordure gu.
46) (Balweerie, co. Fife). Ar. three lions’ heads erased gu. Crest—A demi lion gu. holding in paw a cutlass ppr. Motto—Dieu m’a fait fort. Supporters—Two lions per fess gu. and or.
47) (Ancrum, co. Roxburgh, bart., 1671). Arms, as the last, a mullet az. for diff. Crest—A lion's head erased gu. Motto—Tace aut face.
48) (Spain, 1685). As Balweerie, within a bordure gu. charged with eight cinquefoils ar. Crest—A lion’s paw holding a thistle ppr. Motto—Reddunt aspera fortem.
49) (Logie, co. Forfar). Ar. a fess crenellée betw. three lions' heads erased gu. Crest—A lion's head erased holding a cinquefoil in his mouth ppr. Motto—Aut tace aut face.
50) (Hedderwick). Ar. three lions’heads erased gu. within a bordure of the last charged with six fleurs-de-lis of the first. Crest—A lion’s head erased gu. Motto—Me fortem reddit Deus.
51) (Benholm, co. Forfar, 1692). Or, three lions' heads erased gu. within a bordure crenellée of the last. Crest—A lion issuant holding in his dexter paw a rose slipped ppr. Motto—Fortis et placabilis.
52) (Brotherton, co. Kincardine, 1764). As Logie, with a mullet gu. in chief for diff. Crest—A lien ramp. brandishing a scymitar ppr. Motto—Paterno rebore tutus.
53) (Dunninauld, co. Forfar, bart., 1806). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. a fess counter-embattled betw. three lions’ heads erased gu. Crests—A lion’s head erased gu. langued az.: and, Out of a ducal coronet a garb betw. two sickles. Supporters—Dexter, an heraldic tiger gorged with an antique crown; sinister, a stag ppr. horned or, collared gu. and holding in his mouth a thistle ppr. Motto—Spe Tires augenter.
54) (Bengal, 1824). Ar. on a fess crenellee betw. three lions’ heads erased gu. a chessrook of the fleld. Crest—A lion’s head erased holding a cinquefoil in his mouth ppr. Motto—Ant tace ant face.
55) (Netherlands, 1776). Ar. on a bend engr. az. betw. two triple-leaved slips of oak ppr. a star betw. two crescents or, a bordure embattled gu. Creat—A stag’s head erased gu. Motto—Ardenter amo.
56) (East India Service, 1811). Or, on a bend engr. az. a star betw. two crescents of the field, in sinister chief a dove with an olive branch in its beak ppr. Crest—A dove, as in the arms.
57) (Madras, 1829). Or, on a chev. betw. two mullets in chief and a crescent in base az. a bezant. Crest—A stag's head erased ppr. Motto—Fideliter amo.
58) (Wooden, co. Roxburgh, 1856). Or, on a bend az. betw. two eagles’ heads erased, each holding in the beak a laurel branch ppr. a mullet betw. two crescents of the field. Crest—A stag trippant ppr. Motto—Amo.
59) (Robson-Scott, of Ashtrees, co. Roxburgh, 1859). Or, on a bend az. a star betw. two crescents of the first, on a chief gu. a stag trippant also of the first betw. two boars’ heads couped ar. Crest—A stag trippant ppr. Motto—Patriam amo.
60) (Robson-Scott, of Newton, co. Roxburgh, 1859). The same, with a bordure gu. Same Crest and Motto.
61) (Kelly, co. Renfrew, 1863). Or, a lymphad, sails furled and oars in action sa. flagged gu. surmounted by a bend az. charged with a mullet betw. two crescents ar. Crest—A stag trippant ppr. Motto—Ready, aye ready.
62) (Dr. John Scott, London, 1864). Per fess ar. and az. on a bend a mullet betw. two crescents counterchanged. Crest—A stag trippant ppr. Motto—Fidus et fortis.
63) (MacMillan-Scott, Wauchope, co. Roxburgh, formerly of Goldilands). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, or, on a bend az. a mullet betw. two crescents of the first, a bordure compony of the second and first, for Scott; 2nd and 3rd, parted per pale or and ar. a lion ramp. sa. in chief three mullets az., for MacMillan. Crests—1st, Scott: A stag’s head erased gu.; 2nd, MacMillan: A dexter and sinister hand issuing from the wreath brandishing a two-handed sword all ppr. Mottoes—Over the crests: Miseris succurro; under the arms: Ardenter amo.
64) (Howclench, co. Selkirk). As the preceding, without MacMillan, in chief a crescent counterchanged for diff.
65) (Scott’s Hall, co. Kent; the family claim descent from William Baliol le Scot, brother of Alexander Baliol, of Chilham Castle, co. Kent, and of John Baliol, King of Scotland; William Baliol le Scot was buried at Canterbury; his descendants have been buried at Brabourne, co. Kent., for nearly 600 years, and were settled there and at Scott’s Hall, temp. Edward I., until the beginning of the last century. Of this family were the following: Sir William Scott, Chief Justice of England and Knight Marshal temp. Edward II. and Edward III.; Sir William Scott, Swordbearer to Henry V., and M.P. co. Kent; Sir Robert Scott, Lieutenant of Tower of London, 1424; Sir John Scott, Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports, Governor of Dover Castle, Comptroller of Calais, and Comptroller of the Household, temp. Edward IV.; Sir William Scott, his son, Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports, Governor of Dover Castle, temp. Henry VIII.; Sir John Scott, Knight of the Body Guard to Henry VIII; Sir Reginald Scott, Captain of Calais, temp. Henry VIII.). (Shrewsbury and Tonge Norton, co. Salop; descended from Anthony Scott, Esq., of Scott’s Hall, temp. Queen Elizabeth). (Scott-Warinh; descended from the foregoing). (Heath House, Weybridge, co. Surrey). (co. Lincoln, and the Manor House, Ham, co. Surrey; represented by Sir George Gilbert Scott, Knt., LL.D.). (The Moat, co. Sussex; descended from Edward Scott, Esq., second son of Sir William Scott, K.B., of Scott’s Hall, Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports) Ar. three catharine wheels sa. a border engr. gu. Crest—A demi griffin segreant sa. beaked and legged or. Motto—Blen ou rien.
66) (Woolston and Stapleford Tany, co. Essex; descended from Scott, of Scott’s Hall, branched off temp. Henry IV.). Per pale indented ar. and sa. a saltire counterchanged.
67) (Camberwell, co. Surrey; descended from Sir John Scott, Judge of the Common Pleae, temp. Henry VIII., son of Sir John Scott, Knt., of Scott's Hall, Knight of the Body Guard to the King). Ar. on a fess sa. three boars’ heads or.
68) (Holden, co. Kent; descended from John Scott, 1380, who sprung from Scott, of Scott’s Hall). Ar. a cross crosslet fitchée sa.
69) (Conghurst, co. Kent; descended from Thomas Scott, second son of Henry Scott, Esq., of Holden, d. 1472, who m. Mildred, only dau. and heir of George Conghorst, of Conghurst; the co-heiresses of Thomas Scott, Esq., were Dorothea, m. Rev. John Frewen, of Northiam, and Katherine, m. Stephen Frewen, of London). Ar. a cross crosslet sa.
70) (Thomas Scott, alias Rotherham, Bishop of Rochester 1468, of Lincoln 1472, Archbishop of York 1480, d. 1500). Vert three stags trippant ar. attired or.
71) (Aldborough, co. York; descended from John Scott, nephew of Thomas, alias Rotherham, Archbishop of York, descended from Scott, of Scott’s Hall). Same Arms. Crest—A stag’s head erased ppr.
72) (Great Barr, co. Stafford, bart.; arms granted 1663). Ar. on a fess gu. with two barrulets az. betw. three catharine wheels sa. as many lambs pass. or. Crest—On a mount vert a beacon fired ppr. ladder or. Motto—Régi patriæque fidelis.
73) (Stourbridge, co. Worcester; Robert Scott, Esq., of Stourbridge, youngest son of the Rev. Charles Wellbeloved, of York, m. 1830, Sarah, only dau. and heir of John Scott, Esq., of Stourbridge, High Sheriff co. Worcester, 1830). Ar. on a mount of bulrushes in base ppr. a bull pass, sa. a chief pean billety or, a canton of the last. Crest—A stag couchant ppr. the dexter paw resting on a billet or, charged on the shoulder with a cross crosslet of the last. Motto—Nunquam libertas gratior.
74) (co. Essex). (Enfield, co. Middlesex). Per pale indented ar. and sa. a saltire counterchanged. Crest—Out of pales or, an arm erect habited az. cuffed ar. holding a truncheon of the last.
75) (co. Suffolk). Per pale ar. and sa. a saltire counterchanged.
76) (Rotherfield Park, co. Hants; originally of Woolston Hall, co. Essex). Per pale indented ar. and sa. a saltire counterchanged. Crest—An arm erect couped at the elbow, habited gu. cuffed erm. the hand ppr. holding o roll of paper ar. the arm environed with park pales or.
77) (co. Surrey). Ar. on a fess sa. three boars’ heads or.
78) (co. York). Ar. three catharine wheels sa. Crest—A monkey pass, collared round the waist and lined.
79) (Islington). Per pale indented ar. and sa. a saltire counterchanged. Crest—A dexter arm erect vested sa. cuffed ar. holding in the hand a roll of paper ppr.
80) (Kew Green, co. Surrey; Marquess of Mezangere, in Normandy; John Scott, son of Peter Scott, of Monny, co. Perth, settled in Flanders 1519; his grandson, William Scott, having been naturalised, is stated to have been created a bart. of England in 1653). Or, a stag couchant ppr. gorged with a collar az. thereon a mullet ar. betw. two crescents of the first, in the dexter chief point a rose gu., for diff. Crest—A stag’s head couped ppr. gorged with a collar az. thereon a mullet ar. betw. two crescents or.
81) (Duke of Monmouth, attainted 1685; James Crofts, illegitimate son of Charles II., was created, 1663, Duke of Monmouth, Earl of Doncaster, and Baron Tynedale, m. same year, Ann Scott, Countess of Buccleuch in her own right (afterwards created Duchess of Buccleuch), when he assumed the surname of Scott, and was created Duke of Buccleuch. His grace was beheaded in 1685, and attainted, when his titles fell under the attainder; Francis, second Duke of Buccleuch, grandson of the attainted Duke of Monmouth, s. his grandmother in the Dukedom of Bucclettch and other Scotch honours, and was restored to his grandfather’s English Earldom of Doncaster with the Barony of Tynedale, honours which descend to the present Duke of Buccleuch). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, the arms of France and England quarterly; 2nd, the arms of Scotland; 3rd, the arms of Ireland, over all a baton sinister ar. Crest—On a chapeau gu. turned up erm. a dragon statant ar. ducally gorged and lined gu. Supporters—Dexter, a unicorn ar. armed, maned, and tufted or, ducally gorged and lined gu.; sinister, a stag ar. ducally gorged and lined gu.
82) (Baron Stowell, extinct 1836; William Scott, Judge of the Court of Admiralty, eldest brother of John Scott, first Earl of Eldon, was so created 1821, d. without surviving male issue). Ar. three lions’ heads erased gu. in chief an anchor aa. on a chief wavy az. a portcullis with chains or. Crest—A lion's head erased gu. charged on the neck pith a portcullis or. Supporters—Two lions guard, ppr. on each a portcullis pendent by a chain from the neck, to which is affixed a shield ar. charged with an anchor sa. Motto—Sit sine labe.
83) (Earl of Eldon). Ar. three lions’ heads erased gu. in chief an anchor erect sa. on a chief wavy az. a portcullis with chains or. Crest—A lion's head erased gu. gorged with a chain, and therefrom a portcullis pendent or, a mullet ar. for diff. Supporters—On either side a lion guard, ppr. gorged with a double chain, a portcullis attached thereto, from which is suspended a shield ar. charged with a civic wreath vert. Motto—Sed sine labe decus.
84) (Lytchet Minster, co. Dorset, bart.). Per pale indented ar. and pean, a saltire counterchanged. Crest—Out of park pales erm. an arm erect vested per pale indented ar. and gu. cuffed az. holding in the hand a scroll ppr.
85) (Oak Bank, Wetherel, co. Cumberland). Ar. on a bend betw. six estoiles az. an escallop betw. two crescents or. Crest—In front of a stag’s head erased ppr. gorged with a collar gemel or, three crescents gold. Motto—Obstando supera.
86) (Sir Hopton Straford Scott, K.C.B.; granted 7 May, 1836). Erminois three Catharine wheels sa. a border engr. az. in chief pendent by a riband gu. a representation of the silver medal presented to the said Sir Hopton Stratford Scott in approbation of his services at the siege and capture of Seringapatam, over all a chief of the fourth, thereon a hill with lines of defence all ppr. super inscribed Seetabuldee in letters of gold. Crest—A gryphon pass. sa. gorged with an Eastern crown or, supporting with the dexter foreclaw a flagstaff ppr. thereon flowing to the sinister a barmer swallow-tailed gu. inscribed Nagpoor in letters of gold. Motto—Amo.
87) (Barnes Hall, co. York). Vert three roebucks trippant ar. attired or.
88) (Barnston, co. Notts). Per pale indented ar. and sa. a saltire counterchanged. Crest—Out of park pales an an arm erect vested per pale indented ar. and sa. in the hand a scroll of paper ppr.
89) (Rotherfield Park, near Alton, Southants). Per pale indented ar. And sa. a saltire counterchanged. Crest—An arm erect couped at the elbow habited gu. cuffed erm. the hand ppr. holding a roll of paper ar. the arm encircled with park pales or.
90) (Scott-Chad) (Thursford Hall, co. Norfolk). Per pale gu. and ar. a cross potent, in the 1st and 4th quarters a rose, in the 2nd and 3rd a cross pattee all counterchanged, for Chad, quartering Scott. Crests—1st, Chad: A falcon, wings expanded ppr. beaked, legged, membered or, supporting in the dexter claw a cross potent, as in the arms; 2nd: Scott.
91) (Betton Strange, co. Salop). Ar. three catharine wheels sa. a border engr. gu. Crest—A demi gryphon segreant sa. membered gu. Motto—Recte faciendo neminem timeas.
92) (Wood Hall, co. York). Sa. an inescutcheon ar. within an orle of owls or, quartering, Gu. a cross erm. betw. four fleurs-de-lis or, for Fenton. Crest—An owl or, resting the dexter claw on an escutcheon gu. charged with a fleur-de-lis gold. Motto—Non invita Minerva.
93) Or, on a bend az. an estoile betw. an increscent and decrescent of the first. Crest—A hand holding a pen, Motto over—Vive la plume.
94) Ar. a chev. betw. three gridirons sa.
95) Gu. three goat’s heads couped or.
96) Or, a cross couped and engr. sa. betw. two mullets in chief and a crescent in base az.
97) (Earl of Clonmell). Or, on a bend az. an estoils betw. two crescents ar. Crest—A buck trippant ppr. Supporters—Dexter, a female figure, representing Justice, holding in her right hand a sword, and with the left a balance all ppr.; sinister, a female figure, representing Mercy, her exterior hand resting on a sword, point downwards also ppr. Motto—Fear to transgress.
98) (William Scott, High Sheriff of the Queen’s co.; Fun. Ent, Ulster's Office, 1661, of his wife, Mary, dau. of Sir John Edgeworth, Knt., of Dublin). Ar. a crescent betw. three catharine wheels sa. a border engr. gu.
99) (William Scott, Searcher of the Port of Dublin; Fun. Ent. Ulster's Office, 1635, of his wife, Elizabeth, dau. of Robert Harris, Esq., High Sheriff co. Donegal). Ar. three catharine wheels sa. a border engr. gu. a crescent on a crescent for diff.
100) (granted, 1814, to Matthew Henry Scott, Esq., Rear Adm. R.N., son of John Scott, Esq., of Jamaica, and grandson of John Scott, Esq., of Ballingarry, co. Tipperary, and to their descendants). Ar. on a fess gu. cotised az. betw. three catharine wheels sa. as many lambs puss, of the first, in the centre chief an anchor in pale of Ihe last. Crest—A rock rising out of the sea, thereon a beacon fired all ppr. Motto—Regi patriseque fidelis.
101) Per pale indented ar. and sa. a saltire counterchanged. Crest—An arm vested gu. holding a roll of paper ppr.
102) or Scotton - (Norwich). Per fess or and az. a mullet of eight points counterchanged.
103) (co. Kent). Erm. on a cross gu. five martlets or

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