Steadman Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Steadman Family Coat of Arms

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Steadman Coat of Arms Meaning

Steadman Name Origin & History

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Steadman Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Steadman blazon are the boar, chevron and snail. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, argent and vert .

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

In the middle ages, the wild boar, a far more fearsome creature than its domesticated relative, the pig was a much more commonly seen animal than today. It was also known as a sanglier. 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 72 It can appear in many of the same poses that we see for the lion, but has its own (easily imagined!) position known as enraged! 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Boar We should not be surprised then that this “fierce combatant” is said to be associated with the warrior. 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P67

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 12A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.13The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

The snail or house snail does not occur often in heraldry but is always shown in full, with shell on its back. 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Snail In meaning can be read as a symbol of “deliberation and perserverance”. 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P71

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Steadman Name

This interesting surname is a variant of Stead, which is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and has two possible origins, the first being a locational name from Stead in the West Riding of Yorkshire, or from some other place taking its name from the Old English pre 7th Century “stede”, farm, estate, place. More common variations are: Steademan, Steadmann, Steaadman, Steadhman, Steadmman, Stedman, Stadman, Steademann, Steedman, Stiedman.

The surname Steadman first appeared in Gloucestershire Where they held a family seat from very early times, where they were Lords of the manor. The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Uchtred Stede, dated 1180, in the Pipe Rolls of Devonshire. It was during the reign of King Henry 11, who was known as “The Builder of Churches” dated 1154-1189.  Surname all over the country became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.  It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.  Surnames all over the country began to develop with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

Some of the people with the name Steadman who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included John Steadman who settled in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1686. People with the surname Steadman who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Catherine Steadman, who settled in Virginia in 1741.  Ann and James Steadman, who settled in Maryland in 1742. Some of the people with the surname Steadman who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included James Steadman, who landed in New York in 1822. Some of the population with the surname Steadman who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included Mr. Steadman, who landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1843 aboard the ship Mandarin.

Steadman Family Gift Ideas

Browse Steadman family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Ar. a chev. gu. betw. three boars’ heads couped sa. Crest—A demi griffin or.
2) (Scotland, 16th century). Ar. a fess vert betw. three snails az.
3) (Scotland, 16th century). Ar. two snails in chief az. and in base a bunch of three holly leaves vert.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 72
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Boar
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P67
12. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
13. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Snail
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P71