Wear Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Wear Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Wear Coat of Arms Meaning

Wear Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Wear. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

wear coat of arms

Wear Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Wear blazon are the mullet, fess and crescent. The three main tinctures (colors) are ermine, azure and or .

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 1A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 10A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

The fesse (also found as fess) is one of the major ordinaries to found in heraldry, being a bold, broad, horizontal band across the centre of the shield. It may originally have arisen from the planks of which a wooden shield can be constructed, the centremost plank being painted a different colour 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse. It is instantly recognisable as a symbol, for example the arms of COLEVILLE granted during the reign of Hery III are simply or, a fesse gules. With this clear association with the construction of the shield itself, Wade believes that the fesse can be taken to be associated with the military, as a “girdle of honour”.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

Wear Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Wear Name

Wear Origin:

England

Origins of Wear:

Listed in recordings of the surname as Wer, Werre, Wear and Weare. It is a surname of early Celtic or before 8th-century Anglo-Saxon sources. It has many possible origins, all in a sense residentiary. The first origin of the name may express someone who exists by the northern English river named the “Wear.” It was first listed as the “Vedra” in Ptolemy’s “Geographia,” of the year 150 A.D. and acquires from a Celtic word which means simply “water.” The second possible origin of the name is geographical and expresses a person who lived by a dam or water source, or may be another case, worked there. If so it is ultimately a professional surname for a holder of the fishing dam. Here the acquisition is from the Old English word “waer or wer,” which means a dam or water source. Possibly, it is locational from the city of Ware in Hertfordshire. The surname itself first shows in documents of the surname in the mid-13th Century and another previous example is that of John atte Wer, listed in the Premium Tax rolls of the division of Sussex in 1332. John Weare was the Master of the ship “Virgin of Southampton,” which moved from that harbor to the isle of Barbados in the year 1639. Royal Symbol gave to the family of the name who resided at Hampton House, Hereford, has the blazon of a silver field embellished with a green curve in the mid of six red crosses crosslet and three gold crosiers.

Variations:

More common variations are: Weare, Weary, Weair, Weaer, Weahr, Weaur, Wearr, Wiear, Welar, Weari.

England:

The origins of the surname Wear were found in Devon, one of the first documentations listed as Peter de la Were who recorded in a poll in 1242 and John atte Were recorded in a Somerset poll in 1332. Usually, this family acquire from an old section of THE Giffards of Devon and Somerset and not associated with the Weir of Vere families. Few say well, in old times before the 12th century, the Weare-Giffards of Brightly and Halsworthy hold the name Weare and ultimately declined the Giffard part of the name.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Peter de la Were, dated about 1242, in the “Feet of Fines of Herefordshire.” It was during the time of King Henry III who was known to be the “The Frenchman,” dated 1216 – 1272. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling variations of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Wear had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Wear settled in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Wear who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Robert Wear arrived in England in the year 1718.

Some of the people with the surname Wear who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Joseph Wear would eventually settle in Virginia in 1711. Duncan Wear in New York in the year 1740. Mary Wear landed in South Carolina in 1772 and Robert Wear arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the year 1773.

The following century saw more Wear surnames come. Some of the people with the surname Wear who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Robert Wear came to Allegany Division, Pennsylvania in 1838. John S Wear arrived in Charleston, South Carolina in 1843. Edward Wear at the age of 32 arrived in San Francisco, California in the year 1850. William W. Wear arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the year 1866.

Canada:

Some of the people with the surname Wear who settled in Canada in the 18th century included Mary Wear arrived in Nova Scotia in 1750. Danl Wear and George Wear, both landed in Nova Scotia in the same year in 1760.

Australia:

Some of the people with the surname Wear who settled in Australia in the 19th century included William Wear at the age of 37 landed in South Australia in 1849 aboard the ship “William Money.” Andrew Wear at the age of 25 arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Hydaspes” in the year 1851.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Wear: United States 4,469; England 731; Australia 303; Indonesia 693; Canada 258; South Africa 164; Brazil 302; Ghana 320; Pakistan 1,509; Bangladesh 4,469.

Notable People:

David Wear (born 1990), American basketball player.

James H. Wear (1838-1893), was an American merchant.

Joseph Wear (1876-1941), was an American player in tennis.

Peter Wear (born 1949), Australian journalist

Ron Wear (born 1979), is a Canadian artist.

Travis Wear (born 1990), is an American basketball player.

Wear Family Gift Ideas

Browse Wear family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More wear Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Az. a fess erm betw. three mullets in chief and a crescent in base or.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
10. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106