Young Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Young Family Coat of Arms

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Young Coat of Arms Meaning

Young Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Younge.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Young. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Young Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Young blazon are the griffin, lion rampant, rose and annulet. The three main tinctures (colors) are or, gules and ermine .

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 2A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? As heraldry developed a whole menagerie of imagined creatures 10Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164 came into being, and their various representations became more or less standardised in form and appearance. The griffin is perhaps the most common of these creatures, being a chimera with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin. It is most often in the pose known as rampant segreant, on its hind legs with claws and wings extended. Vinycomb has much to say on the subject of the griffin, perhaps summarised in his belief that it represents “strength and vigilance”.]12Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 13Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 14Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion rampant is an example of these modified form, and any family would be proud to have such a noble creature displayed on their arms. Rampant is the default attitude of the lion, raised on its hind legs, facing to the dexter and with front paws extended in a fearsome and powerful pose.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 15A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The rose is also of this type, being drawn, at least a little, realistically and often to very pleasing effect. It has long been present in English heraldry, and as a badge and symbol played an enormous in English history throughout the conflict between rival dynasties known as the War of the Roses. In addition to these familial uses, Wade suggests that red roses signify “beauty and grace” and the white represents “love and faith”. 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P132-133

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Young Name

Young Origin:

Scotland, England

Origins of Name:

The surname of Young is of an Anglo-Saxon Pre 7th Century derivative of the word “geong” which can be translated to the Middle English word “yunge” or “yonge” and all are literally translated to mean “the young one.” This surname also possibly derives from the Old Gaelic “og” which can be translated to mean “young.” This surname may have stemmed from a nickname for someone who was the youngest member of their family, or someone who looked young in their appearance. Either way, this surname was only considered to be hereditary in some cases, whereas in other cases it was a byname used to describe the youngest member of a family, to differentiate their order, as in Medieval times families often named all of their children with the same given name, and added a byname following this identical given name, to differentiate the children. It was also said that this surname was used to distinguish both a father and son who were both named with the same personal given name.

Variations:

More common variations are: Younge, Younga, Yoeung, Ayoung, Yeoung, Youngo, Oyoung, Youing, Yooung, Eyoung, Younng

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Young comes from the country of England. One person by the name of Walter Yonge was mentioned in the Subsidy Rolls of Sussex in the year of 1296. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King Edward I, who was known as “The Hammer of the Scots” for his constant warring with the neighboring country of Scotland. King Edward I ruled from the year 1272 to the year 1307. Other mentions of the surname of Young throughout the country of England include Richard le Yunge, who was recorded in Lichfield, Staffordshire in the year 1301, and Edmond Young, who married Katharyn Wendover on September 14, 1568, at Sudbury. Those who carry the surname of Young can be found in large quantities throughout the English countryside. The areas with the largest concentrations of those who bear the surname of Young include Somerset, Dorset, Hants, Gloucestershire, and Kent.

Scotland:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Young in the country of Scotland was one John Yong de Dyngvale. This person John Yong de Dyngvale was said to be a witness of a charter by the Earl of Ross to Reginald, Son of Roderick of the Isles in the year of 1342.

United States of America:

During the 1600’s many European citizens began to migrate to the United States of America in search of a new life. Many of these European citizens were dissatisfied with the government of their home country, because of the living conditions and religious persecution. This movement was referred to as The European Migration. The first people who arrived in the United States who bore the surname of Young were one Richard Young and his wife, who arrived in the state of Virginia in the year 1623. In the year of 1635, Joseph and Margaret Young, and their two young sons arrived in New England. Those who bear this surname can be found in New York, Illinois, Ohio, California, and Texas.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Young: United States 5244,930; England 66,601; Canada 49,562; Nigeria 43,405; Australia 41,512; South Africa 23,140; Scotland 12,752; Ghana 7,988; New Zealand 7,195; Hong Kong 6,098

Notable People:

John Thomas Young (1949-2016) who was an MLB player from America, who played for the Detroit Tigers in the year 1971

Clarence Clifton “Cliff” Young (1922-2016) who was a jurist and politician from America, served as a Member of the U.S. House of Representatives from the year 1953 to the year 1957, served on the Nevada State House of Representatives from the year 1966 to the yeaer 1980, and served on the Nevada Supreme Court from the year 1985 to the year 2002

Quentin Young 9(1923-2016) who was a physician from America, and believed in and advocated for single-payer healthcare throughout the United States of America

Leonidas Bernard “Lee” Young II (1953-2016) who was a Baptist minister from America, and who was also a politician, and served as the 74th Mayor of Richmond, Virginia in the year 1994 to the year 1996

Walter Earnest Young Jr. (1980-2015) who was an MLB player from America who played as a first baseman and designated hitter for the Baltimore Orioles in the year 2005

George Cressler Young (1916-2015) who was a lawyer and judge from America, and who served as the Senior Judge of the United States District Court for the Middle District of Florida from the year 1981 to the year 2015

Murat Bernard “Chic” Young (1901-1973) who was a cartoonist from America who is most well known for his creation of the long-running comic strip “Blondie”

Young Family Gift Ideas

Browse Young family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (alias Morgan) (John Young, alias Morgan, Bishop of St. David's 1496-1504). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, or, a griffin segreant sa.; 2nd and 3rd, az. a chev. betw. three greyhounds ar.
2) (John Young, Bishop of Rochester 1578-1605; confirmed by Dethick, Garter, 1578). Per saltire az. and gu. a lion pass. guard. or. Crest—A lion's head guard. or, betw. two wings ar. each charged with a fleur-de-lis az.
3) (Sir Charles George Young, Garter King of Arms, d. 1869). Motto—Nullius in verba. Erm. on a bend betw. two eagles displ. sa. three griffins' heads erased or. Crests—1st: A dragon couchant, wings elevated gu. collared and chain reflexed over the back or, in the mouth a rose per pale gold and ar. seeded and slipped ppr.; 2nd: In water representing the sea an anchor erect sa. ring and stock or, the shank entwined by a serpent ppr.
4) (North Dean, co. Bucks, bart.). Motto—Press through. Or, three piles sa. on a chief of the first as many annulets of the second. Crest—A cubit arm erect, the hand grasping an arrow all ppr.
5) (Formosa Place, co. Berks, bart.). Motto—Be right and persist. Per fess sa. and ar. in chief two lions ramp. guard. and in base an anchor erect with cable all counterchanged. Crest—A demi unicorn couped erm. maned, armed, and hoofed or, gorged with a naval crown az. supporting an anchor erect sa.
6) (Poulton-cum-Seacomb, co. Chester, and co. Flint; confirmed 10 June, 1625). Per pale erm. and ermines a Iion ramp. or. Crest—A demi lion or, collared per pale erm. and ermines.
7) (Hawkhurst, co. Kent). Per pale vert and or, on a bend engr. erm. plain cotised ar. betw. two escallops of the last as many griffins’ heads erased ppr. Crest—A griffin’s head erased per fess vert and or, charged with two escallops counterchanged.
8) (Kingerby, co. Lincoln). Motto—Toujours jeune. Per bend sinister erm. and ermines a lion ramp. or. Crest—A wolf sejant reguard. sa. holding betw. the forepaws the head of King Edmund ppr. and also a lion ramp. or.
9) (London; Robert Young, of London, gent., was father of a dau., Ann, wife of Sir William Dethick, Garter King of Arms, and a son, Thomas Young, whose dau. and heir, Ann Young, m. Charles Merrick, Esq. of Norcot, co. Middlesex. Visit. Middlesex, 1663). Erm. on a chief az. three lions ramp. ar.
10) (Orlingbury, co. Northampton; descended from Young, of Crombe D'Abitot, co. Worcester). Ar. on a bend sa. three griffins’ heads erased or. Crest—A boar’s head and neck erased ppr.
11) (co. Northumberland). Gu. a fess betw. three lions ramp. or. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, an ibex ar. attired gold.
12) (co. Salop). Ar. three roses gu.
13) (Trent, co. Somerset; arms on the monument in St. Mary Magdalene’s Church, Taunton, to John Young, gent, of Trent, d. 1629). Or, three roses gu. a canton of the second. Crest—A cubit arm erect habited az. holding a. staff or.
14) (Kerno, co. Stafford). Az. a buck’s head couped ar. attired or, betw. two annulets in bend sinister of the last.
15) (Clare, co. Suffolk; the daus. and co-heirs of James Young, Esq., of Clare, son of Rev. James Young, Rector of Tolpuddle, co. Dorset, and grandson of George Young, Esq.; of Beare Regis, were, Elizabeth, wife of The Rev. N. Cook, and Mary, wife of Sir Lachlan M'Lean, Knt., of Sudbury, M.D.). Per fess sa. and ar. three lions ramp. counterchanged.
16) (Kenton, co. Suffolk). Or, three roses gu.
17) (Lambeth, co. Surrey). Erm. on a bend betw. two eagles displ. sa. three griffins’ heads erased ar. Crest—From water ppr. an anchor erect sa. stock and ring or, the stem entwined by a serpent also ppr.
18) (Westminster). Erm. on a chief az. three lions ramp. or.
19) (Croome D’Abitot, co. Worcester, and Stratton Audley, co. Oxford; descended from John Young, of Croome, temp. Henry VIII.). Ar. on a bend sa. three griffins’ heads erased or, quartering Jennett. Crest—A stork, wings expanded ar. beaked gu. holding in the beak a snake ppr.
20) (Poole House, co. Worcester; a branch of Young, of Croome D’Abitot. Visit. Worcester, 1682). Same Arms, quartering, Or, three roses gu., another coat of Young. Crest—A wolf pass. sa.
21) (co. York). Gu. a fess or, in chief three lions ramp. of the last. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, an ibex head ar. armed and tufted gold.
22) Az. a martlet betw. three mullets or, a border invecked gobonee ar. and gu. Crest—A lion ramp. guard. per fess or and gu. supporting a battle-axe gold.
23) Lozengy ar. and vert on a chev. az. three bezants, on a chief gu. a goat's head erased or, enclosed by two cinquefoils of the last. Crest—A squirrel sejant gu. charged on the body with a chev. componee or and az. holding a nut branch vert, fructed gold.
24) (Stancombe, England; Reg. Ulster’s Office). Erm. on a bend cotised sa. three griffins' heads erased or.
25) (Newton-a-More, co. Kildare, formerly of Youngstown, in same co., settled for many generations at the latter place. Visit, city of Dublin, 1607). (Dublin; Gerrot Young, Mayor of Dublin, 1599, second son of John Young, Esq., of Newton-a-More. Visit, city of Dublin, 1607). Bendy of six ar. and gu. a lion ramp. sa. armed and langued az.
26) (Bailieborough Castle, co. Cavan, bart.) Motto—Robori prudentia praestat. Ar. three piles sa. each charged with a trefoil slipped or, on a chief of the second as many annulets of the third. Crest (granted 1821)—A demi lion ramp. gu. on the shoulder a trefoil slipped or, the dexter paw grasping a sword ppr.
27) (Baron Lisgar, extinct 1876; Right Hon. Sir John Young, second bart. of Bailieborough Castle, G.C.B., G.C.M.G., chief Secretary for Ireland 1852-55, Lord High Commissioner of the Ionian Isles 1855-59, Governor of New South Wales 1860-67, Governor-General of Canada 1868-72, was created a peer 1870 , and d. s. p., when the peerage expired, and the baronetcy reverted to his nephew). Motto—Prudentia. Same Arms. Crest (granted 1871)—A demi lion ramp. gu. armed and langued az. charged on the shoulder with a trefoil slipped, and holding in the dexter paw a sprig of three maple leaves also slipped or. Supporters—Dexter, a female figure ppr. vested ar. mantled az. holding in the exterior hand a paddle or; sinister, a like figure vested ar. mantled vert, holding in the exterior hand a crook or.
28) (Harristown, co. Roscommon; confirmed to James Young, Esq., of Harristown, only surviving son of Owen Young, Esq., of Harristown, and to the descendants of his ancestor, Owen Young, of Castlerea, the first of the family who settled in Ireland from co. York). Motto—Victoria fortitudo virtus. Gu. on a fess or, a trefoil vert, in chief three lioncels ramp, of the second. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, an ibex’s head ar. horned and tufted gold, and charged on the neck with a trefoil vert.
29) (Tully, co. Cavan; confirmed by Fortescue, Ulster, to Richard Young, Esq., of Tully). Gu. on a chev. ar. three trefoils slipped vert, a chief or, charged with three pellets. Crest—A horse’s head couped sa.
30) (Auldbar, co. Forfar). Motto—Roberi prudentia præstat. Ar. three piles sa. on a chief of the last as many annulets or. Crest—A lion issuing out of a wreath gu. holding a sword in pale ppr.
31) (Leny, Scotland). Motto—Press through. Ar. on three piles sa. as many annulets or. Crest—A dexter arm holding a lance in bend ppr.
32) (Rosebank, Scotland). Ar. three piles indented sa. on a chief of the last aa many annulets or. Crest—An anchor placed in the sea and surmounted of a dove holding an olive branch in the beak all ppr.
33) (Eastfield, Scotland, 1672). Motto—Scripta manant. Ar. on three piles sa. as many annulets or, within the midmost a star of six points of the first. Crest—A dexter hand holding a pen ppr.
34) (Lindbank, Scotland, 1672). Ar. on three piles sa. as many annulets or, within the midmost a quatrefoil of the first. Crest—A dexter hand ppr. holding a bezant.
35) (Sheriff Clerk of co. Kircardine 1732). Mottoes—Pro patria semper; and, Dominus providebit. Ar. three piles sa. on a chief of the last as many annulets or, and on the middle pile a bear’s head couped ar. muzzled gu. Crest—A sword and writing pen saltireways ppr.
36) (co. Berks). (Bassildon, co. Berks; granted 1607). Ar. on a chev. az. three bezants, on a chief gu. two cinquefoils or. Crest—Out of a mural crown gu. a goat's head or.
37) (Buckhorne and Colbrooke, co. Dorset). Per fess sa. and ar. three lions ramp. guard. counterchanged. Crest—A demi sea unicorn ar. armed and finned gu.
38) (co. Dorset). Per pale sa. and ar. three lions ramp. guard. counterchanged. Crest—A sea unicorn ar. finned and horned gu.
39) (Raxwell and Roxhall, co. Essex). Ar. on a bend sa. three griffins' heads erased of the first, a border engr. of the second bezantée. Crest—A griffin’s head erased or, within a chaplet vert.
40) (co. Hants). Lozengy or and vert a chev. az. Crest—A stag's head erased per fess erm. and gu.
41) (London, and Drayton, co. Stafford; confirmed by Segar, Garter). Ar. fretty vert, on a chief az. three roses or, barbed of the second. Crest—A Cornish chough perched on a rock all ppr.
42) (Grenford, co. Middlesex, and Durnford, co. Wilts; granted to John Younge, of Durnford, 1572). Vair on a chief gu. three lions ramp. or. Crest—A demi greyhound erased ar.
43) (Margaret Younge, wife of Simon Brangley, of Dublin; impalement Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Office, 1610). Sa. on a bend cotised ar. three griffins’ heads erased of the field, langued gu.
44) (Metheley, co. York). Ar. on a chief gu. three lions ramp. guard. of the first.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
2. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
10. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin
12. Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150
13. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
14. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141
15. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P132-133